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August 1, 2010
August 2, 1922
August 3, 1938
August 3, 1752
August 4, 1856
August 4, 1891
August 5, 1852
August 6, 1890
August 7, 1966
August 8, 1877
August 9, 1784
August 10, 1909
August 11, 1787
August 11, 1968
August 12, 1762
August 13, 1953
August 14, 1912
August 15, 1844
August 15, 1945
August 16, 1802
August 16, 1874
August 17, 1965
August 18, 1833
August 18, 1930
August 19, 1869
August 20, 2014
August 21, 1857
August 21, 2011
August 22, 1962
August 23, 1766
August 24, 1858
August 25, 1910
August 26, 1814
August 27, 1929
August 27, 2016
August 28, 1781
August 29, 1911
August 29, 2012
August 30, 1894
August 31, 1843
August 1, 2010

August 1, 2010

Mi’kmaq First Nations celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of St. Anne’s Mission at their annual gathering at Potlotek (Chapel Island) Cape Breton — one of the oldest Roman Catholic sites in Canada and recognized as a place of national historic significance. Saint Anne has been the recognised Mi’kmaq patron saint since 1629–30. It was also four hundred years since the baptism of Mi’kmaq Chief Membertou in 1610. But Potlotek is...
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August 2, 1922

August 2, 1922

Alexander Graham Bell died in Baddeck. “Bell died of complications arising from diabetes . . . at his private estate, Beinn Bhreagh, Nova Scotia, at age 75 . . . [He] was buried atop Beinn Bhreagh mountain, where he had resided increasingly for the last 35 years of his life, overlooking Bras d’Or Lake. He was survived by his wife Mabel, his two daughters, Elsie May and Marian, and nine...
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August 3, 1938

August 3, 1938

Nellie L. McClung (1873–1951), Canadian feminist, politician, author and social activist, wrote a piece in the Register (Town of Berwick), entitled The Flavour of Nova Scotia. She reflected upon visiting Nova Scotia to attend the Silver Jubilee Convention of the Women’s Institutes of Nova Scotia in Halifax. (Photo: Nellie L. McClung. Library and Archives Canada).
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August 3, 1752

Thomas Peregrine Hopson replaced Governor Edward Cornwallis at Halifax. Hopson had been sent from Gibraltar to reinforce the Louisbourg garrison in 1746, after the New England and British forces captured it from the French. He took command of Île Royale in 1747 and, under the terms of the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, returned the island to the French in July of 1749.
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August 4, 1856

August 4, 1856

The Halifax School for the Deaf first opened on Argyle Street in Halifax. It was the first school for the deaf in Atlantic Canada. William Gray (1806–1881), a deaf immigrant from Scotland, was its first teacher, with two deaf students. Another deaf immigrant from Scotland, George Tait (1828–1904), a self-employed carpenter, was also instrumental in furnishing and raising funds for the school. By 1857, the school had an enrollment of...
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August 4, 1891

August 4, 1891

The Flying Bluenose went into operation on the Windsor and Annapolis Railway. It ran from 1891 to 1936, going as far as Yarmouth. (Photo: The Flying Bluenose at Smith’s Cove, heading up the Annapolis Valley. Library and Archives Canada).
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August 5, 1852

Sir Gaspard Le Marchant (1803–1874) was sworn in as lieutenant governor. He served till February 1858, and later served as governor of Malta from 1859 to 1864. He once wrote, “I am determined to rise to the head of my profession and nothing but death will stop me.” He had an illustrious career in the history of the British Army, and founded the British Royal Military College.
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August 6, 1890

Yarmouth incorporated as a town. Its first mayor was James J. Lovitt. On August 6, 1892, Yarmouth became the first town to begin an electric streetcar line in the Maritime Provinces (the third in Canada).
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August 7, 1966

August 7, 1966

The Men of the Deeps Coal Miner's choir, made up of working and retired coal miners from Cape Breton, was organized as part of the Miner’s Folk Society (founded in 1964). The group was an effort to preserve in song some of the rich folklore of the island’s coal mining communities. Begun with the vision of Nina Cohen and the leadership of Myles Macdonald as their first executive director, the...
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August 8, 1877

August 8, 1877

The first official passenger train arrived at the new Intercolonial Railway Station in Halifax. The station was located at the foot of North Street, south of Richmond (Barrington), land that was later below the Angus L. Macdonald Bridge. By 1902 the station was a very busy place. (Photo: The Intercolonial Railway Station, Halifax, 1902. Library and Archives Canada).
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August 9, 1784

August 9, 1784

Joseph Frederick Wallet DesBarres (1721–1824) was appointed lieutenant governor of Cape Breton. He served till 1787. He was a noted surveyor and military engineer (present at Ticonderoga in 1757, the fall of Louisbourg in 1758 and at Quebec in 1759). He later resided at Falmouth, not far from Fort Edward, in Castle Frederick. There he worked on surveys that created the Atlantic Neptune, an extensive series of naval charts and...
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August 10, 1909

The Springhill coal mine strike began, lasting till May 1911. A conflict had ensued between the home-grown Provincial Workmen’s Association (PWA, formed in 1879), which had represented the miners and which the company was open to negotiate with, and the United Mine Workers of America (UMW), which had won support from the miners but the company refused to recognize. Company ownership of the mine also changed during the strike.
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August 11, 1787

August 11, 1787

Captain William Dyott arrived in early July in Halifax as adjutant of the King’s Own Regiment of Foot (The Royal Lancasters, known as the 4th). He was also a diarist, and on this day, he had a fishing trip in the harbour, going out around Cornwallis Island (later known as MacNab’s Island); "“When we tired ourselves with fishing, we sailed to an island two miles lower down, where they landed;...
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August 11, 1968

August 11, 1968

Angus James Walters died (b. in Lunenburg, 1881). He was the first captain of the Bluenose, from 1921 to 1938. Walters won five international sailing races and was undefeated for seventeen years. He was one of the first inductees into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame (inducted in 1955). In 2006, he was recognized as a Person of National Historic Significance in Canada. (Also see Bluenose, March 26, 1921 and...
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August 12, 1762

Abbé Pierre Maillard died (b. 1710). A Roman Catholic priest in the Spiritan Order, he arrived at Louisbourg in 1735 as a missionary to the Mi’kmaq. Recognized by the French and British military authorities as an exceptional individual, he was also highly respected by the Mi’kmaq. He assisted in peacemaking and treaties between the British and Mi’kmaq in 1761 and up to the time of his death. He was buried...
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August 13, 1953

Family Court Justice Corrine Sparks was born in Loon Lake. She became the first African Nova Scotian to receive an appointment to the judiciary and the first African Canadian female to serve on the bench (1987). Within African Nova Scotian history, Justice Sparks traced her ancestors from the events of the resettlement of the Black Loyalists around 1783.
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August 14, 1912

August 14, 1912

The Memorial Tower on the Northwest Arm was dedicated: “. . . Halifax welcomed His Royal Highness Prince Arthur, the Duke of Connaught, the first royal Governor General of Canada, to officially dedicate the Memorial Tower. . . . ceremoniously delivered the 1908 title deeds for Sir Sandford Fleming Park to Mayor F.P. Bligh.” On April 16, 1908, an Act of Government established the Sir Sandford Fleming Park (called the...
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August 15, 1844

August 15, 1844

After holding their first National Acadian Convention at the College Saint-Joseph at Memramcook (NB), the Acadians designated this day as their national day of celebration. This day is also the Roman Catholic Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Société Nationale l’Assomption (SNA) was created during this convention to organize the annual conventions and be a voice of the Acadian people to various levels of government. At...
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August 15, 1945

August 15, 1945

The Chinese community in Halifax gathered at the Chinese Benevolent Association on Grafton Street, Halifax, to celebrate Victory over Japan Day (VJ Day). As photographer Albert Lee pointed out, Chinese immigrants started to arrive in Nova Scotia in the late 1800s. Over 17,000 had been recruited to help build the Canadian Pacific Railway. After its completion, many either returned to China, remained in British Columbia or moved to Eastern Canada....
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August 16, 1802

A ship arrived in Sydney with 299 Highland immigrants. It was estimated that between 1773 and 1803 at least ten vessels bearing Scottish emigrants landed in Nova Scotia. Cape Breton Island was the last substantial area on the Atlantic Coast of North America to be opened to Scottish emigration. Nova Scotia later received some 22,000 Scottish immigrants from 1815 to 1838, the majority from the Highlands and Islands. Peak immigration...
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August 16, 1874

August 16, 1874

Gabriel Sylliboy was born in Whycocomagh (d. 1963). He later became the first Mi'kmaq elected Grand Chief (1919) and was the first to fight for the recognition of the Mi'kmaq Treaty Rights of 1752 in the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia when he was charged with illegal hunting in 1928. But the courts dismissed the notion that a 1752 treaty gave him any rights. Decades later, the Supreme Court of...
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August 17, 1965

August 17, 1965

Treasure hunters were reported killed at Oak Island, NS. The Associated Press wrote, “A six-year $200,000 hunt for a legendary pirate treasure has ended in death for Robert Restall, his son and two others. The four men died Tuesday on tiny Oak Island, off Nova Scotia’s south coast. They were overcome by gas in a shaft 27 feet deep, one of about 200 bored by treasure seekers in the past...
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August 18, 1833

August 18, 1833

The Royal William sailed for England from Pictou, to prove a steamship could make the transatlantic crossing. Considered the fastest ship of its day, it was commissioned by brewer John Molson and a group of investors (including Samuel Cunard from Halifax) and launched from Quebec in 1831. (Painting: The SS Royal William, 1834. Samuel Cunard: Nova Scotia’s Master of the North Atlantic, John Boileau).
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August 18, 1930

Government took control of the selling liquor in the province. A plebiscite taken in October 1929 saw 87,647 vote in favour of government control (to 56,082). Prohibition had been enacted in 1921 after a plebiscite in October of 1920.
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August 19, 1869

The Windsor & Annapolis Railway officially opened between Annapolis and Grand Pré. The Railway proclaimed: “Welcome to the Land of Gabriel and Evangeline.” Its corporate successor, the Dominion Atlantic Railway, promoted the “Evangeline Route” for more than eighty years. But it wasn’t till the Yarmouth Steamship Company inaugurated its service between Boston and Nova Scotia in the late 1880s that summer visitors started coming. (Also see, 'Windsor to Annapolis Railway...,'...
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August 20, 2014

August 20, 2014

Hugh Alan ‘Buddy’ MacMaster died in Judique, Nova Scotia (b. 1924). He was a much loved and renowned artist of traditional Cape Breton fiddle music, and considered a true ambassador of Canadian music and a mentor to many. (Also see Natalie MacMaster, June 13, 1972.) He was a recipient of the Order of Canada (2000), the Order of Nova Scotia (2003) and an honorary doctorate from Cape Breton University (2006)....
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August 21, 1857

August 21, 1857

A wedding party was hosted in Halifax by Mali Kristia’n Po’l (anglicized to ‘Marie-Christiane Paul,’ also Christina, Christy Ann, 1804–1886), a Mi’kmaw basketry, beadwork and porcupine quillwork artist and model, with her husband, Thomas Morris (Maurice), for their adopted daughter, Charlotte, to Louis Paul, a young man from Hants. As the mother-in-law, Marie wore “a bright scarlet bodice and richly flounced pink skirt . . . a lady well known...
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August 21, 2011

A memorial celebration for friends and residents of the Carmelite Hermitage Nova Nada monastery (1972–1998) was held at the fifty-six acre Birchdale property. The monastery had been closed due to clearcut logging that had begun near the property. It was later purchased in 2002 to create a secular, rustic, no-frills getaway retreat setting.
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August 22, 1962

The Halifax Advisory Committee on Human Rights was formed “. . . at the invitation of several residents of Africville, to advise in matters related to an anticipated clearance of the Africville land area for industrial use.” — Chairman H.A.J. Wedderburn, writing in a letter to His Worship the Mayor and Aldermen, City of Halifax. Later the committee would be called the Nova Scotia Humans Rights Federation.
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August 23, 1766

August 23, 1766

Michael Francklin (Franklin, 1733–1782) was sworn in as lieutenant governor, serving till 1772. He came to Nova Scotia in 1752 and became a successful colonial merchant and politician. He was captured by a band of Mi’kmaq in 1754, but was released after three months. He also spoke French and was influential among the Acadians, allowing them to return following the expulsion to resettle in NS. He was first elected to...
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August 24, 1858

Sir William Fenwick Williams (1800–1883), hero of the Crimean War (1853–1856), returned to Halifax. He was born in Annapolis Royal and became a renowned military leader for the British during the Victorian era, serving in Turkey at Constantinople and in Anatolia. His gallantry was in defence of the town of Kars against the Russians in the Crimean War. Though defeated and imprisoned, he was released at the end of the...
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August 25, 1910

August 25, 1910

Actress and dancer Ethyl 'Ruby' Keeler was born in Dartmouth (d. 1993). When she was a young child, her family moved to New York where she became a dancer and actress, starring in such hits as 42nd Street (1933) and No, No, Nanette (1971). She married American singer, actor and comedian, Al Jolson, in 1928. (Photo: Ruby Keeler, c.1935. Wikipedia Creative Commons).
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August 26, 1814

The Castine expedition set sail from Halifax under Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (1764–1830), commander of the British forces in the Atlantic area. War with the United States had begun in June 1812, and a long-disputed borderland issue had broken out in the Passamaquoddy Bay area and the Penobscot River where the expedition was headed. They made landfall at Castine. During a successful eight-month occupation, the expedition yielded substantial customs revenues,...
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August 27, 1929

August 27, 1929

Irving Schwartz was born in New Waterford (d. 2010). He became a noted businessman, community leader, philanthropist and humanitarian. After completing his education, he managed his parent’s small clothing store and later expanded into other business opportunities. He was involved extensively in many volunteer service organizations. He was awarded Officer of the Order of Canada in 2004 (four years after his sister, Ruth Goldbloom - see 'Ruth Miriam Goldbloom' August...
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August 27, 2016

August 27, 2016

The Last Steps memorial was recognized on the Halifax waterfront to pay tribute to the departure of the first full battalion of Nova Scotia soldiers to fight in the First World War, and the role that Nova Scotia played in the defence of the nation during wartime — a project of the Army Museum Halifax Citadel, designed by artist Nancy Keating. (Photo: The Last Steps Memorial, a project of the...
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August 28, 1781

Annapolis Royal was captured and plundered by American privateers. Prominent citizens, John Ritchie and Thomas Williams were taken hostage, but later released.
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August 29, 1911

August 29, 1911

The Naval Service of Canada was given royal sanction, becoming the Royal Canadian Navy. On May 4, 1910, the Naval Service Act had established the Canadian Navy. In addition to a regular force, the Act also included a reserve and a naval volunteer force, and a Royal Naval College, located in Halifax. The first Canadian servicemen to die in combat during the First World War were four cadets from this...
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August 29, 2012

August 29, 2012

Ruth Miriam Goldbloom (née Schwartz) died (born 1923). Born in New Waterford, she was educated at Mount Allison and McGill, where she met her husband, Richard Goldbloom. They moved to Halifax in 1967. She became an active community member and fundraiser in many causes, such as health, the post-secondary sector and cultural institutions. Most notably, she cofounded the Pier 21 Society in 1990, with founding President John P. LeBlanc and...
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August 30, 1894

The first meeting of the Executive of Halifax Council of Women occurred at Government House, with Mrs. J.C. Macintosh as president and Anna Leonowens as recording secretary. (Also see 'Anna Harriet Leonowens...' January 19, 1915).
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August 31, 1843

August 31, 1843

Our Lady of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church on South Park Street, Halifax, was built in a day. The Holy Cross Cemetery surrounds it on a western sloping hill. (Photo: Holy Cross Cemetery, by Leo J. Deveau).
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