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July 1, 1941
July 1, 1867
July 2, 1821
July 3, 1961
July 4, 1940
July 5, 1890
July 5, 1775
July 6, 1921
July 7, 1795
July 7, 2008
July 8, 1903
July 9, 2016
July 10, 1970
July 11, 2009
July 11, 1970
July 12, 1625
July 13, 2009
July 14, 1749
July 15, 1872
July 16, 2013
July 16, 1861
July 17, 1860
July 18, 1912
July 19, 1908
July 19, 1784
July 20, 1996
July 21, 1819
July 22, 1915
July 23, 1962
Julyl 24, 1963
July 24, 2001
July 24, 2018
July 25, 1749
July 26, 1939
July 27, 1758
July 28, 1870
July 29, 2013
July 30, 1970
July 31, 1967
July 31, 1885
July 1, 1941

July 1, 1941

The Cape Breton Highland Links golf course in Ingonish opened. Designed by golf course architect Stanley W. Thompson (1893–1953), it was recognized as one of his masterpieces — one of 145 courses he designed from Cape Breton to Brazil. “Thompson gave every hole a Gaelic name and the fourth has an appropriate one – Heich O’ Fash. That translates as Heap of Trouble,” wrote Bob Weeks. (Photo: Hole 12 of...
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July 1, 1867

As proclaimed by Queen Victoria, four provinces were joined as “One dominion under the name of Canada . . . with a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the United Kingdom”: Canada West (formerly Upper Canada, then Ontario), Canada East (formerly Lower Canada, later Quebec), Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Title to the Northwest Territories was transferred by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1870, and the province of Manitoba...
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July 2, 1821

July 2, 1821

Sir Charles Tupper was born in Amherst. He was educated at Horton Academy became a doctor and later was an MLA and served as premier of Nova Scotia. He was become the last surviving Father of Confederation, a federal cabinet member, the sixth prime minister of Canada, and a commissioner to London. He published Recollections of Sixty Years in 1914. He died in England in 1915 and was interred at...
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July 3, 1961

July 3, 1961

CBC television began broadcasting Singalong Jubilee (1961–1974). It started as a summer replacement for the popular Don Messer Show. Singalong Jubilee was produced by Manny Pittson, with co-producer and host Bill Langstroth, singer Jim Bennett and Brian Ahern as the music director. The program featured musical performances by local singers in a variety of music genres, such as Anne Murray, Catherine McKinnon, Gene MacLellan, Edith Butler and many more who...
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July 4, 1940

July 4, 1940

Haliburton Museum opened in Windsor. Formerly known as the Clifton House, the former residence of noted nineteenth century author and judge Thomas Chandler Haliburton was constructed in 1837. He lived there with his wife, Louisa Neville, and their seven children (three had died in their first years) till he was widowed in 1841. He moved to England in 1856. Now known as the Haliburton House, it was the first Historic...
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July 5, 1890

July 5, 1890

Catherine Susan Ann Howe (née McNab) died. Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, in 1807, she moved to Halifax in 1817 and lived with her parents on McNab’s Island. On February 3, 1828, at St. Paul’s Church, she married Joseph Howe. She helped run his business as well as their busy household and family of ten children. She was buried in Camp Hill Cemetery. (Photo: Catherine Susan Ann Howe (née McNab).
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July 5, 1775

Governor Francis Legge issued a Proclamation forbidding persons to Aid or Correspond with any persons in [American] Rebellion. Justices of the peace were directed to proclaim it and “cause it to be read several times in all places of public worship.” Seventy-five per cent of Nova Scotia’s settler population of 20,000 was of New England origin.
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July 6, 1921

July 6, 1921

Allan J. MacEachen was born in Inverness, Cape Breton Island (d. 2017). He entered politics in 1953 as an MP for Inverness-Richmond (1953–’58, 1962–’68) and for Cape Breton Highlands–Canso (1968–’84). He served in several portfolios, including as deputy prime minister under Pierre Elliott Trudeau, from 1977 to 1979. He was later appointed to the Senate. (Photo: Allan J. Maceachern. Library and Archives Canada, Duncan Cameron).
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July 7, 1795

July 7, 1795

The first meeting of the Nova Scotia Presbyterian Synod occurred near Alma, Pictou County. (Photo: Covenanter’s Church, Grand Pré, the oldest extant Presbyterian Church in Canada — constructed between 1804 and 1811.)
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July 7, 2008

July 7, 2008

The Joggins Fossil Cliffs were named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, spanning more than fifteen kilometres of fossil-bearing cliffs that are witness to more than 310 million years of geological and paleontological riches. Across the Minas Basin from Joggins, in the rocks at Horton Bluff, Sir William Edmond Logan became the first to recognize in North America the tracks of Carboniferous vertebrate animals, in 1841. (Photo: Cliffs and reefs at...
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July 8, 1903

July 8, 1903

Evern ‘Earl’ Bailly was born in Lunenburg (d. 1977). He contracted polio at age three and became a wheelchair-bound quadriplegic for the rest of his life. However, by the age of six he learned to paint by holding a brush between his teeth and later became a highly-regarded artist. In 1947, he was featured in the film On the Shores of Nova Scotia. (Photo: Nova Scotia artist Earl Bailly met...
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July 9, 2016

July 9, 2016

A hundredth anniversary commemoration ceremony for the No. 2 Construction Battalion (formed on July 5, 1916), Canada’s first and only black battalion was held at the deCoste Centre, Pictou. Over 500 members of the Nova Scotia black community volunteered for service with No. 2 Construction Battalion, and the unit also included 165 African Americans, along with volunteers from the British West Indies and Guyana. Before proceeding to France, the unit...
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July 10, 1970

July 10, 1970

The A. Murray MacKay Bridge over Halifax Harbour was officially opened. The bridge was named after Alexander Murray MacKay, who was chairman of the Halifax-Dartmouth Bridge Commission from 1951 to 1971. He had also overseen the construction of the Angus L. Macdonald Bridge. (Photo: The A. Murray MacKay Bridge. Wikipedia Creative Commons).
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July 11, 2009

Ex-Beatle Paul McCartney performed an outdoor concert on the Halifax Common. Though enjoyed immensely by those in attendance, ticket sales were less than anticipated and later a controversy unfolded when it was revealed that massive expenses associated with the concert had been underwritten with taxpayer funds.
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July 11, 1970

July 11, 1970

The Ross Farm Museum was formally opened by Premier G. I. Smith. Depicting life as it once was in rural Nova Scotia, it was named after Captain William Ross, who settled in the New Ross area in 1816. (Photo: Ross Farm. Tourism Nova Scotia).
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July 12, 1625

July 12, 1625

Charles I renewed the 1621 royal charter first established by King James for the lands of New Scotland to Sir William Alexander, Earl of Stirling (1577–1640). The lands were known as Nova Scotia in Latin, Nouvelle Écosse in French and Alba Nuadh in Scottish Gaelic. The Royal Charter did not recognize the region we now know as Mi’kma’ki. (Map: Sir William Alexander’s New Scot Lande map, 1624. Centre for Newfoundland...
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July 13, 2009

Mi’kmaw basket-maker and Second World War veteran Noel Abraham ‘Abe’ Smith died at age ninety-two in Windsor (b. in Berwick, 1917). In 1991, he was featured with his wife, Rita, in a National Film Board film called Kwa’nu’te that profiled the artistry and skill of their basket-making. Rita (1918–1996) was the past president of the former Mi’kmaq Arts and Crafts Society, and was the first chief of Horton Mi’kmaw community...
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July 14, 1749

July 14, 1749

Governor Edward Cornwallis held his first council deliberations onboard the Beaufort transport in Halifax Harbour. On June 21, he had arrived in with 2,547 volunteer settlers and soldiers. He had orders to establish and secure a settlement. At the council meeting, Governor Cornwallis opened his commission and took the oaths of office in the council’s presence and the Civil Government was organized. (Photo: Table used by Edward Cornwallis on the...
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July 15, 1872

Mary Eliza Herbert died (b. 1832). She was an author, poet and magazine editor as well as the first woman in Nova Scotia to edit and publish a magazine (at the age of eighteen): the Mayflower, or Ladies’ Acadian Newspaper, a small thirty-two-page volume (1851–52). Her older sister was author, publisher and educator Sarah Herbert (1824–1846).
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July 16, 2013

July 16, 2013

Alex Colville died (b. 1920). An internationally renowned Canadian painter and Wolfville resident (from 1973), he was a Companion of the Order of Canada (1982), a recipient of the Order of Nova Scotia (2003) and appointed to the Privy Council (2003). In the summer of 2014 the Art Gallery of Ontario hosted Colville’s work, one of the largest (more than 100 works) and most successful exhibits of an artist’s work...
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July 16, 1861

July 16, 1861

Richard Preston died (b. 1791). He was a religious leader (ordained on May 19, 1832) and abolitionist. He escaped slavery in Virginia to become an important leader for the African Nova Scotian community and in the international struggle against slavery (the community of Preston, Nova Scotia, was named after him). He was the founder of the Cornwallis Street United Baptist Church in 1832. (Image: Richard Preston. Black Cultural Centre for...
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July 17, 1860

July 17, 1860

The unveiling of the Welsford-Parker Monument took place in St. Paul’s Cemetery in Halifax. The monument was shaped in the form of a triumphal arch and surmounted by the British lion. It was built in memory of Major Augustus Frederick Welsford (1811–1855) and fellow soldier William Buck Carthew Augustus Parker (1823–1855) — commemorated as imperial heroes at the Battle of the Great Redan during the Siege of Sevastopol in Crimea....
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July 18, 1912

The first Montessori School in North America opened in Baddeck. It began with the support of Alexander Graham Bell and his wife Mabel, for their grandchildren. Twelve pupils attended the school (in a loft of a Beinn Bhreagh warehouse) under the teaching direction of Roberta Fletcher from Washington.
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July 19, 1908

July 19, 1908

Author Ernest Buckler was born in West Dalhousie (d. 1984). Best known for his novels The Mountain and the Valley (1952) and The Cruelest Month (1963). He was educated at Dalhousie University and the University of Toronto (Philosophy) and later returned to rural Nova Scotia to farm and write. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1974 and also won the Leacock Award for Humour (1978)...
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July 19, 1784

July 19, 1784

The wooden frame of St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church was raised in Halifax at the corner of Spring Garden Road and Barrington. In 1833 the name was changed to St. Mary’s Cathedral. (Image: St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church. Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Halifax).
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July 20, 1996

The National Historic Sites and Monuments Board unveiled a monument in honour of the memory of Black Loyalists who arrived in Birchtown, Shelburne County. Two smaller groups of Black Loyalists had also settled in Brindley town (present day Jordantown, Digby County) and Tracadie.
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July 21, 1819

Richard Uniacke, Jr. fatally wounded Scottish merchant William Bowie in a duel on the Governor’s North Farm (later known as the Fort Needham/Mulgrave Park area). The challenge occurred from insulting remarks made by Uniacke. Uniacke was charged with murder, but later found innocent.
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July 22, 1915

July 22, 1915

Sir Sandford Fleming died in Halifax at his daughter’s home. Born in Scotland in 1827, he came to Canada in 1845 with his family. He was Canada’s foremost railway construction engineer for most of the Intercolonial Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway, as well as an inventor and scientist who developed the model for international standard time. He was a founding member of the Royal Society of Canada, the Royal...
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July 23, 1962

July 23, 1962

Daniel MacIvor, a well-known Canadian actor, playwright, screenwriter, film and theatre director, was born in Sydney. He won notable awards, including (twice) the Chalmers Award for best new Canadian play (twice), the 2006 Governor General’s Award for Drama, and the 2008 Siminovitch Prize in theatre (playwright). He held the position of Western University’s writer-in-residence for 2017-2018. (Photo: Daniel MacIvor, 2016. Playwrightsguild.ca).
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Julyl 24, 1963

Julyl 24, 1963

The Bluenose II launched in Lunenburg. A replica of the original Bluenose, it was built by Smith and Rhuland and sponsored by the Oland’s Brewery (it was sold to the NS government in 1971). In 2009, the Nova Scotia government decided to restore the fifty-year-old Bluenose II. After lengthy delays, the ship was relaunched in 2015. An initial cost estimate of $14.4 million was budgeted for the restoration, but due...
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July 24, 2001

July 24, 2001

Dr. Carrie Best died in New Glasgow (b. in Halifax, 1903). A journalist, radio broadcaster, social activist, author and respected leader of the African-Nova Scotian community, she founded (with her son, James C. Best) the first African-Nova Scotian–owned newspaper, the Clarion. The paper, which began publishing in 1946, was renamed in 1949 the Negro Citizen and continued until 1956. In her first issue, December 1946, Best broke the story of...
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July 24, 2018

July 24, 2018

Rex Tasker, Executive Producer and founder of the Atlantic production studio for the National Film Board, died at his home in Musquodoboit Harbour, Nova Scotia. He and his then-wife, Shelagh MacKenzie, had established the NFB studio in 1973 (which today is housed under the Quebec Atlantic Studio in Halifax, with a production office in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.) "Tasker produced and executive produced approximately 100 films during his tenure...
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July 25, 1749

July 25, 1749

A Halifax settler, who arrived with Cornwallis’s fleet in June, wrote to a friend back in Britain. The letter appeared in a periodical in October. Once established, a third of the settlers who arrived with Cornwallis either did not survive their first winter, or left for Boston. The settler wrote: On our arrival we found the Sphinx [Cornwallis's ship], of 20 guns, which had come into harbor a few days...
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July 26, 1939

The Gaelic College / Colaisde na Gàidhlig at St. Ann’s opened. It was founded by Presbyterian minister A.W.R. MacKenzie. On December 6, 2012, the college was honoured by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the prefix Royal, as part of the college’s seventy-fifth year of operation in promoting and preserving the customs and traditions of immigrants from the Highlands of Scotland.
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July 27, 1758

July 27, 1758

With the surrender by French Governor Drucour, Major General Jeffery Amherst, with naval commander Admiral Edward Boscawen and Brigadiers James Wolfe, Charles Lawrence and Edward Whitmore, captured Fortress Louisburg. This was also the last major battle the Mi’kmaq fought against the British. (Also see Admiral Edward Boscawen, May 9, 1758.). (Painting: A View of Louisburg in North America, Taken from the Lighthouse, when that City was Besieged in 1758, Pierre...
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July 28, 1870

On July 28, 1870, Mather Byles Almon, president of the Bank of Nova Scotia, announced that the cashier, James Forman,“ . . . has been guilty of making many fraudulent entries in the books of the bank, by which he has abstracted a large amount of its funds.” Forman was later accused of embezzling over $300,000 from the bank. Resigning in disgrace, Forman soon left Nova Scotia for England.
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July 29, 2013

July 29, 2013

Well-known human rights crusader, lawyer and advocate for Nova Scotia’s black community for over four decades, Burnley ‘Rocky’ Jones, died (b. 1941). “When you stick your head in the lion’s mouth and hear him roar, there is no more excitement in this world of politics. It is the politics of survival for your community and change in your community” (Burnley ‘Rocky’ Jones Revolutionary, p. 212). In September 2016, an autobiography/memoir,...
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July 30, 1970

July 30, 1970

Maud Lewis died in Digby (b. 1903). She was one of Canada’s best known and most prolific folk artists. The house she and her husband, Everett Lewis, lived in (and where she painted), was later installed as part of a permanent Maud Lewis exhibit in the care of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. Maude Lewis’s life has been the subject of a documentary and stage play. In 2017 a...
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July 31, 1967

July 31, 1967

The Cape Breton Miners’ Museum at Glace Bay was officially opened. Prominent community leader and philanthropist Nina Cohen unveiled the cornerstone for the museum. She was instrumental in founding the Men of the Deeps choir in the summer of 1966. The Museum is currently under-going renovations in preparation for the 2018 tourist season. In 2017 the Museum had over 16,000 visitors. (Also see Nina Cohen, March 8, 1991.). (Photo: Nina...
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July 31, 1885

July 31, 1885

Lumber baron B.B. Barnhill attempted to launch a great log raft at Joggins, bound for New York, but the attempt failed. In December 1887 a second raft was successfully launched, but it never made it to New York, as its tow line snapped in a storm along the Eastern Seaboard and the raft was lost. A third attempt was successful, but no further rafts were shipped from the Joggins Shore....
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