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June 1, 1918
June 1, 1970
June 2, 1953
June 2, 1820
June 2, 2008
June 2, 1933
June 3, 1926
June 3, 1825
June 3, 1858
June 4, 1814
June 4, 1760
June 4, 1978
June 5, 2018
June 5, 1918
June 6, 1813
June 6, 1800
June 7, 1861
June 7, 1995
June 7, 1753
June 8, 2013
June 8, 1755
June 9, 1975
June 9, 1993
June 9, 2013
June 10, 1892
June 11, 1866
June 11, 1925
June 12, 2010
June 13, 1972
June 14, 2012
June 15, 2016
June 16, 1874
June 17, 2017
June 18, 1784
June 18, 1906
June 19, 1849
June 20, 1833
June 21, 1749
June 22, 1897
June 23, 1930
June 24, 1497
June 24, 1911
June 25, 1761
June 26, 1854
June 27, 1918.
June 27, 2013
June 27, 1984
June 28, 1794
june 29, 1749
June 29, 2011
June 30, 2012
June 1, 1918

June 1, 1918

Young recruit David Ben-Gurion (1886–1973) arrived in Windsor, NS, to begin training with the newly formed Jewish Legion of the British Army at Fort Edward, with a plan to fight against the Ottoman Turks in Palestine. Over 1,100 non-commissioned Jewish officers were trained in Windsor. Ben-Gurion had enlisted on April 26, 1918, in New York City and trained in Windsor. He would later become a primary founder of the State...
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June 1, 1970

June 1, 1970

CBC Information Morning Halifax began broadcasting, featured co-hosts Bob Oxley and Paul Kells, news by Frank Cameron and Brian Bullock, sports by George Young and weather by Reid Dexter. The following year, Don Tremaine became a host with Gerry Fogarty as sportscaster. By 1976, Don Connolly joined Tremaine. The show went on later to feature Don Connolly, with co-host Louise Renault, sports by John Hancock and weather by Brennan Mitchell....
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June 2, 1953

June 2, 1953

At the age of 25, following the death of King George VI, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II takes place at Westminister Abbey. It required 14 months of planning and preparation. It was the first British coronation to be televised. Queen Elizabeth II is now in her 91st year (2017) and is the longest reigning British monarch in history. (Photo: Queen Elizabeth II with The Duke of Edinburgh in her...
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June 2, 1820

Sir James Kempt (1765–1854) was sworn in as lieutenant governor. He served from 1820 to 1828, and was a veteran of the Battle of Waterloo and the War of 1812, amongst other military exploits. He also served as Governor of British North America (1828–1830). Kemptville and the Kempt Shore were named after him.
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June 2, 2008

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was established to respond to the accusation of abuse and other ill effects on First Nations children that resulted from the Indian residential school program. After a series of national events and consultations, the commission concluded its work in June of 2015, submitting a report identifying ninety-four “Calls to Action’ to ‘redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian...
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June 2, 1933

June 2, 1933

The first Apple Blossom Festival was held in the Annapolis Valley. (Image: Promotional material for the Apple Blossom Festival, 1934 . Appleblossom.com.)
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June 3, 1926

June 3, 1926

Flora MacDonald was born in North Sydney (d. 2015). A distinguished Canadian politician and humanitarian, she was first elected to the House of Commons in 1972. She was Canada’s first female foreign minister and the first woman to seek the leadership of the Progressive Conservatives, in 1976. (Photo: Wikipedia Creative Commons).
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June 3, 1825

The schooner Mary began a mail packet and passenger service from Pictou to Charlottetown, PEI, every Tuesday evening. By 1832, a weekly service was being provided with the steamboat SS Pocahontas. By 1864, the paddle steamer SS Princess of Wales was providing regular service.
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June 3, 1858

The Windsor Branch of the Nova Scotia Railroad was opened to Windsor Junction and on to Halifax. To celebrate the opening of the Windsor Branch, the following Tuesday, June 8, was declared a public holiday in Halifax by the lieutenant governor, His Excellency Sir Gaspard le Marchant, the Earl of Mulgrave; all shops and offices were closed to enable the population to celebrate.
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June 4, 1814

June 4, 1814

A captured American privateer and prisoner at Melville Island, Benjamin Franklin Palmer, wrote in his diary, “Four prisoners carried to Target Hill [later known as Deadman’s Island] this morning, a place where they bury the dead. I'm fearful a number of us will visit that place this summer if not shortly released.” It's estimated that, between 1812 and 1815, as many as 8,000 captured American soldiers, sailors and privateers were...
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June 4, 1760

June 4, 1760

The New England Planters began to arrive in Nova Scotia to settle on former Acadian lands. Townships were established in Newport, Falmouth and Horton. Many Planter descendants still reside in the area, some on the original land grants. One of their landing places was at Boudreau’s Bank on the Rivière des Habitants (in Mi’kmaq, the Chijekwtook/Jijutu’kwejk). They later would rename the river and district Cornwallis. (Photo: The Planter's Monument. Leo...
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June 4, 1978

The Evelyn Richardson Non-Fiction Award was first awarded — named in honour of Evelyn Richardson (1902–1976), who won the Governor General’s Non-Fiction Award in 1945 for We Keep a Light, her memoir of life as a family of lighthouse keepers in Shelburne County. As of 2017, the award had honoured the best non-fiction titles by Nova Scotian authors for thirty-nine years.
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June 5, 2018

June 5, 2018

The Highland Arts Theatre in Sydney, Nova Scotia presented a "Tribute to The Rotary Show.' The Rotary Show had started in 1955 and ran more than thirty years, providing Cape Breton theatre goers with Broadway's finest musicals with down-home, local productions at the Vogue Theatre, the Savoy, as well as at the St. Andrew's Hall. The first production was the operetta "The Red Mill." The June show featured over 80...
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June 5, 1918

June 5, 1918

While the First World War raged on in Europe, by late spring 1918 the first phase of a “three day fever” began to appear. A few deaths were reported, while some victims (ages fifteen to forty) recovered after a few days. However, by September the virus appeared in North America and became widespread globally. It did not discriminate and struck fast, eluding treatment and control. It became known as the...
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June 6, 1813

June 6, 1813

The victorious Royal Navy frigate HMS Shannon returned to Halifax under the command of Provo William Parry Wallis. In tow, he had the USS Chesapeake from Boston. Wallis’s captain had died during the battle outside Boston Harbour on June 1. Wallis took command and sailed the Shannon back to Halifax with the captured Chesapeake in tow. Chesapeake’s commander, Captain James Lawrence, died of his wounds on the way to Halifax....
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June 6, 1800

June 6, 1800

William Cobbett (1763–1835) and family arrived in Halifax, fleeing from the United States en route to England. He had served with the 54th Regiment of Foot in New Brunswick, became a popular writer (author of The Soldier’s Friend in 1792), and was an early witness to the French Revolution. But he had also become a controversial political and pro-British pamphleteer and commentator in the United States. He had been charged...
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June 7, 1861

June 7, 1861

Annie Louise Prat was born in Paradise, Annapolis County. Her life spanned a century. She was the daughter of Samuel Prat and Elizabeth (née Morse). Annie and her siblings were raised in Wolfville where her father was the first train-station master, and later became the superintendent of several stations in the Annapolis Valley. Her mother was the sister of John Morse, founder of Morse’s Tea in Halifax. Annie became a...
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June 7, 1995

June 7, 1995

Charles S.A. Ritchie died (b. 1906 in Halifax). Educated at King’s College, and later at Oxford, Harvard and the École Libre des Sciences Politiques, he became a distinguished Canadian diplomat and a compelling diarist. He won the 1974 Governor General’s Award for his diary account published in 1974 as The Siren Years: A Canadian Diplomat Abroad 1937–1945. He later published three further volumes: An Appetite for Life (1977), Diplomatic Passport...
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June 7, 1753

Fourteen hundred German settlers, who had arrived in Halifax in 1750–51, left Halifax to establish a settlement in Lunenburg.
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June 8, 2013

June 8, 2013

Former CBC producer Nicholas ‘Manny’ Pittson died (b. Halifax, 1937). He had a career spanning sixty years. He started in high school as an announcer at CHNS Radio in Halifax, later becoming the youngest producer in Canada at CBC Halifax, where he produced Frank’s Bandstand, Take Thirty and Singalong Jubilee, and launched the careers of many iconic Canadian singers. As an independent producer, he brought such shows as Don Messer’s...
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June 8, 1755

June 8, 1755

Admiral Edward Boscawen (1711–1761) engaged a French fleet in the Newfoundland fog and, in capturing the sixty-four-gun Alcide (and the Lys), discovered a specific piece of intelligence. Among the French Admiral Hocquart’s papers was a document relating how French troops, working in concert with a general Acadian-Indian uprising, planned to pit some 8,000 men against 3,000 British in an attempt to attack Halifax. Thousands of scalping knives were also found...
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June 9, 1975

Jane Barnes Wisdom died in Pictou County at the age of ninety-one (b. 1884). Born in New Brunswick, she had studied social work in New York and came to Halifax in 1916 to work with the Halifax Welfare Bureau. Considered the first professional social worker in Nova Scotia, she survived the Halifax Explosion and played an active role in the recovery efforts. She did research on the working conditions of...
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June 9, 1993

June 9, 1993

Gordon Parsons died (age forty-two). He was an eclectic cinephile and writer, and a driving force in the Atlantic Canada film industry, including the founding of Wormwood’s Dog and Monkey Cinema (1976). In 1991 he became the Executive Director of the Atlantic Film Festival (which began in St. John’s, NL). Wormwood closed in 1998.
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June 9, 2013

The Lost at Sea Memorial monument was unveiled on Water Street in Yarmouth to commemorate all the sons and daughters of Yarmouth County who died at sea. For example, in the year 1879 alone no fewer than thirty-one vessels were lost along with 106 persons.
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June 10, 1892

Charles Fenery died (b. Upper Sackville, January 1821). He was the inventor of paper from wood pulp and a poet.
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June 11, 1866

June 11, 1866

The was established by William O’Brien, consisting of five horse-drawn vehicles providing passenger transit service in the city. Through various organizational changes and expansions, the horse-drawn vehicles continued till May 31, 1896, when the Halifax Electric Tramway Company began operating streetcars. In 1949, the system changed over to electric trolley coaches and then later to gas-powered buses. By January 1, 1970, the City of Halifax was managing the operation. By...
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June 11, 1925

June 11, 1925

Group of Seven founding artist Lawren Harris (1885–1970) was in the Glace Bay–New Waterford area reporting on the miner’s strike on a commission from the Toronto Star. Ten years earlier, he had been on the battlefields of Europe. During his time in Cape Breton he produced somber images from what he witnessed, one being Miner’s Houses. Earlier in the spring of 1921, Harris had also been in Halifax on his...
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June 12, 2010

June 12, 2010

A ceremony attended by approximately 400 people, including American Civil War reenactment soldiers, was held at Benjamin Jackson’s grave site, marking it with a commemorative stone. Jackson (1835–1915) was a decorated American Civil War soldier, and a sailor, farmer and African Nova Scotian. He was born in Lochartville (near Hantsport). (Photo: Ben Jackson (1835–1915), a decorated American Civil War soldier, sailor, farmer and African Nova Scotian. From Historic Annapolis Valley,...
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June 13, 1972

June 13, 1972

Natalie MacMaster was born in Troy, Inverness County, Cape Breton. She began playing the fiddle at the age of nine and her musical career at sixteen. By 2017 the award-winning fiddler had created twelve albums and toured extensively with many international artists. She won numerous musical awards and was made a member of the Order of Canada in 2006. Her uncle was the late renowned Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster...
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June 14, 2012

June 14, 2012

Nova Scotia writer, editor and author Scott Milsom died. He was a co-founder and editor of the award-winning New Maritimes quarterly journal. He was also author of Voices of Nova Scotia Community: A Written Democracy (Fernwood, 2003), which explored why the people of small communities across Nova Scotia value the quality of life they enjoy. (Photo: Book cover from Fernwood Publishing).
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June 15, 2016

June 15, 2016

The $150-million dollar Big Lift project on the sixty-year- old Angus L. Macdonald Bridge in Halifax officially reached its halfway point in the work to replace all the deck segments of the bridge. By this date, the contractor, the American Bridge Canada Company, had replaced twenty segments out of a total of forty-six, with plans to complete the deck replacement by spring 2017. An informative video of the history of...
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June 16, 1874

June 16, 1874

William A. White was born in Virginia to two former slaves. He became the second graduate of African descent from Acadia University (1903). He later became a chaplain and the first black officer serving in the entire British Army during the First World War. He was the father of Portia White, as well as politicians Bill and Jack White. He was the first Canadian black person to be given an...
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June 17, 2017

June 17, 2017

The National Wine Awards were hosted in Greenwich, Nova Scotia. Featuring over 1,700 wines and ciders, it was the largest wine awards event in Canadian history, featuring six tables of judges. The event was also hosted in Nova Scotia in 2011. The Winery Association of Nova Scotia indicated that, as of 2017, there were seventy grape growers and more than 800 acres under vine in various regions across Nova Scotia,...
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June 18, 1784

The final decision was made in Britain to separate Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.
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June 18, 1906

British imperial government properties in Halifax were handed over to the Dominion.
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June 19, 1849

James Burns Barry, Jr. (1819–1906) of Pictou published his diary — the first of five volumes. An accomplished fiddle player and composer, as well as a piper, artist and printer of some renown (on a press he built himself ), he also compiled two volumes of music, consisting of 2,248 tunes, which were later housed at the NS Archives.
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June 20, 1833

The Maid of the Mist steamboat made her first trip from Saint John to Windsor.
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June 21, 1749

June 21, 1749

After making their passage across the ocean in thirteen transports and one sloop-of-war (the Sphinx), Colonel Edward Cornwallis (age thirty-six) and 2,547 volunteer settlers and soldiers arrived at what later became Halifax, and was then called Chebucto by the British, Cheboutou by the French and K’jipuktuk by the Mi’kmaq, meaning 'chief of biggest harbour'. Their purpose was to establish a new state-sponsored settlement in British North America. The settlers included...
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June 22, 1897

Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee Holiday took place in Halifax with a military review on the Commons, watched by some 25,000. There were large displays of rockets, marching tattoos, ceremonies and music.
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June 23, 1930

The CN-owned Nova Scotian Hotel opened in Halifax, boasting 130 rooms, five suites and a ballroom that could accommodate up to 275 guests. CN sold it in 1981 and it became the Westin Nova Scotian.
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June 24, 1497

June 24, 1497

Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), an Italian navigator from Venice, who had sailed from England under the authority of Henry VII with a crew of eighteen in the Matthew, is said to have planted the British flag on Cape North, Cape Breton. (Photo from John Cabot & The Voyage of the Matthew, Brian Cutherbertson
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June 24, 1911

June 24, 1911

Portia White was born in Truro (d. 1968). She was the first black Canadian operatic contralto concert singer to win international acclaim, making her national debut as a singer in Toronto in 1941. The Portia White Prize was named in her honour. (Also See William A. White, June 16, 1874.). (Photo: Portia White. From Halifax: The First 250 Years, Judith Fingard, Janet Guildford, and David Sutherland.)
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June 25, 1761

The Burying the Hatchet Ceremony (also known as the Governor’s Farm Ceremony — at the Spring Garden Road location of the Halifax Provincial Court House) took place with Mi’kmaq chiefs and colonial officials, ending a period of protracted warfare that had lasted over seventy-five years between the Mi’kmaq/French alliance and the British. The French missionary Abbé Pierre Maillard acted as interpreter.
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June 26, 1854

June 26, 1854

World travel writer (1831–1904) arrived in Halifax on the Cunard Royal Mail steamship the Canada, just in from Liverpool, England, after a nine-day voyage. Bird was travelling with her cousins from PEI (the Swabeys) who had been visiting in London. After a two-day stay in Halifax they left at 6 p.m. by stagecoach to Truro, then on to Pictou to catch a steamer to Charlottetown. Bird would stay in PEI...
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June 27, 1918.

June 27, 1918.

On the evening of June 27, 1918, a German U-boat torpedoed the hospital ship "Llandovery Castle" 190 kilometres west of the southern tip of Ireland. She had been sailing from Halifax with a total of 234 individuals — 143 crew members and 91 Canadian Army Medical Corps personnel lost their lives as all aboard abandoned ship as it sank. Only 18 crew members and six CAMC personnel survived. Three Nova...
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June 27, 2013

June 27, 2013

Spoken word artist, activist and educator El Jones was announced Halifax Regional Municipality’s poet laureate for 2013–2015. Previous poet laureates for HRM included Tanya Davis (2011–2012), Shauntay Grant (2009–2011), Lorri Neilsen Glenn (2005–2009) and inaugural poet laureate Sue MacLeod (2001– 2005). Following El Jones was Rebecca Thomas (2016–2018). (Photo: Courtesy of El Jones.)
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June 27, 1984

June 27, 1984

The Metro Food Bank Society began in Halifax (later Feed Nova Scotia). The society grew into a provincial operation and supported over 148 food banks, distributing food and providing referrals to community services across the province for families in need. In 2017, over 19,722 Nova Scotians turned to food banks each month.
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June 28, 1794

June 28, 1794

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (1767–1820), fourth son of King George III, arrived (aged twenty-seven) in Halifax as commander of the troops in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick (from 1794 till 1800). He was the first member of the royal family to live in North America for more than a short visit. The prince was offered the rural estate of Lieutenant Governor Sir John Wentworth as his residence....
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june 29, 1749

The new French governor of Île Royale (the future Cape Breton), Charles des Herbiers de La Ralière (1700–1752), arrived in Louisbourg with two eighty-gun ships and twenty transports, with 2,000 returning French civilians and 1,000 soldiers. Under the terms of the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748), Louisbourg had been returned to the French. The British commander on site, Peregrine Thomas Hopson (1685–1759), handed the keys over to des Herbiers. In late...
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June 29, 2011

The Bras d’Or Lake Biosphere Reserve, located on Cape Breton Island, was designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. As part of a world network for promoting exchange of information, experience and personnel. As of 2017 there were 621 biosphere reserve sites in 117 countries. Sixteen of those being in Canada.
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June 30, 2012

June 30, 2012

The National Historic Site and surrounding landscape of Grand Pré was given a UNESCO World Heritage designation, qualifying under the cultural landscape category. The Grand Pré area encompassed 1,300 hectares of land and properties in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley. It was the centre of French Acadian settlement from 1682 to 1755. The National Historic Site honours the deportation of the Acadians, which began in 1755 and continued until 1762. (Photo:...
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