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November 1, 2001
November 1, 1956
November 1, 1966
November 1, 1788
November 2, 1836
November 2, 2015
November 3, 1937
November 4, 1967
November 5, 1789
November 6, 1882
November 7, 1951
November 8, 2016
November 9, 1990
November 10, 1990
November 11, 1918
November 11, 1929
November 11, 1993
November 12, 1951
November 13, 1903
November 14, 1606
November 15, 2015
November 15, 1787
November 16, 1857
November 16, 1843
November 17, 1885
November 18, 2003
November 19, 2011
November 20, 1785
November 21, 2014
November 22, 1753
November 22, 2006
November 23, 1960
November 23, 1950
November 24, 1839
November 24, 1809.
November 25, 1982
November 26, 1921
November 27, 1784
November 28, 1918
November 28, 1831
November 28, 1976
November 29, 1829
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November 29, 1949
November 30, 2011
November 30, 1768.
November 30, 2007
November 30, 1968
November 1, 2001

November 1, 2001

The St. John’s Anglican Church in Lunenburg was destroyed by fire. The historic church (completed in 1763) was rebuilt from donations from across the country and around the world. It was reopened on June 12, 2005. The church had been designated a National Historic Site in October, 1998. Canada’s oldest Presbyterian (St. Andrew’s, 1754) and Lutheran (Zion’s, 1772) churches were also in Lunenburg. (First photo: The St. John’s Anglican Church...
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November 1, 1956

An explosion occurred at Springhill’s No. 4 colliery, 1,900 metres down. Thirty-nine miners were killed. Eighty-eight miners were trapped, but later rescued. This was one of the first disasters with on-site radio broadcast reporting. (Also see 'A seismic jolt...,' Oct. 23, 1958.)
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November 1, 1966

The Men of the Deeps Coal Miners' choir of Cape Breton performed their first three concerts from November 1 to 3 at the Savoy (Glace Bay), the Vogue (Sydney) and Paramount (New Waterford) theatres. Over 3,000 people attended. (Also see 'The Men of the Deeps...,' Aug. 7, 1966. And 'The Cape Breton Miners' Museum...,' July 31, 1967.)
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November 1, 1788

November 1, 1788

King’s College opened in Windsor. Largely through bequests and gifts the college later came into possession of a library of eighteenth century books, and one of the most important collections of incunabula (books published before 1501) on the North American continent in the nineteenth century. (Image: Engraving of King's College, Windsor, N.S. 1857.). (Also see 'King's College in Windsor...,' May 12, 1802.)
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November 2, 1836

November 2, 1836

Simon d’Entremont (Argyle) and Frederick Armand Robicheau (Annapolis) became the first French Acadians in North America to be elected to the Nova Scotia General Assembly (the fifteenth Assembly, 1836–1840). Before taking his seat in the House of Assembly, d’Entremont was asked to swear an oath to the British crown. He replied,“You can take back your document. . . I would rather swallow a dogfish, tail first, than swear that.” He...
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November 2, 2015

November 2, 2015

Anne Fulton died at age sixty-four. A self-employed counsellor, editor and writer, she was considered a “founding mother” of Halifax’s gay and lesbian activist community. She was an original member of the Gay Alliance for Equality (1973), and a founder in organizing the Atlantic Provinces Political Lesbians for Equality. (Also see 'THe Nova Scotia feminist newspaper...,' Sept. 6, 1985.). (Photo: Anne Fulton. Courtesy of photographer Robin Metcalfe.)
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November 3, 1937

November 3, 1937

James B. McLachlan died in Glace Bay (b. 1869). A coalminer, union leader, labour leader, farmer and journalist, he arrived in Canada in 1902 to work at the Princess Colliery in Sydney Mines. He became a local leader in the Provincial Workmen’s Association (est. in 1879). He wrote in the Halifax Herald in January 1908, on the 149th anniversary of Robert Burns’s death, “The greatest political question of this century...
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November 4, 1967

November 4, 1967

George Isaac (G.I.) Smith was chosen as leader of the Progressive Conservative Party. He was noted for having recruited Robert Stanfield to help rebuild the party. Smith served as an MLA from 1949 to 1974, and was Premier from 1967 to 1970, succeeding Robert Stanfield, who had served from 1956 to 1967. Smith was later a senator from 1975 to 1982. (Also see 'Birth of Robert L. Stansfield...,' April 11,...
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November 5, 1789

Nova Scotia’s first agricultural society was formed in Horton, Kings County. It was originally known as the Colonial Societias — its founders were mainly New England Planters who immigrated to Nova Scotia after the expulsion of the Acadians. In 1805 the Society changed its name to the Kings County Central Agricultural Society.
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November 6, 1882

A serious fire took place at the Provincial Poor Asylum. Thirty-one people died (out of 343 residents), more lives lost than in any other fire in the city’s history. “The Poor Asylum or Poor House was the primary institution for the care of the elderly, mentally ill and poor. Originally situated on Spring Garden Road at the present site of the Halifax Memorial Library, it was relocated to the South...
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November 7, 1951

November 7, 1951

Princess Elizabeth (who became Queen Elizabeth II - See 'At the age of 25...,' June 2, 1953) visited Nova Scotia with Prince Philip. (Photo: Princess Elizabeth with Prince Philip (1951).)
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November 8, 2016

November 8, 2016

Dr. Frances Wagner died in Falmouth, NS (b. Hamilton, Ontario, 1927). A feminist scientific pioneer, she was educated at the University of Toronto and Stanford University. In 1950, at the age of twenty-three, she began undertaking field research with the Geological Survey of Canada in the James Bay region. Her specialty was micropaleontology, in which she became a distinguished expert, providing insight into biogeological prehistory, and leading the way for...
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November 9, 1990

November 9, 1990

Novelist and essayist John Hugh MacLennan died in Montreal (b. 1907 in Glace Bay). His family moved to Halifax when he was seven. He was educated at the Halifax Academy and Dalhousie University, attended Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, and later Princeton. He worked as a professor of English at McGill, but by 1945 he began writing full-time, winning five Governor General’s Awards. Some of his noted novels include Barometer...
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November 10, 1990

November 10, 1990

The paddle steamer City of Monticello encountered a violent storm and sank five miles off Yarmouth Cape, en route from Saint John to Yarmouth. Forty-six lives were lost, making it one of Yarmouth’s greatest shipping tragedies — leaving fifteen widows and forty-nine fatherless children. The ship was owned by the Yarmouth Steamship Company. (Photo: The paddle steamer City of Monticello. Yarmouth County Museum.)
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November 11, 1918

November 11, 1918

Canadian soldier George Price died at Ville-sur-Haine, a village about fifteen kilometres east of Mons, Belgium — shot by a German sniper. Price was a native of Falmouth (b. 1892), Nova Scotia, but was serving in the 28th (Saskatchewan) Battalion because he was living in Moose Jaw when he was conscripted in December 1917. He is believed to be the last Canadian soldier from the British Empire and Nova Scotian...
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November 11, 1929

November 11, 1929

Dedication of the First World War Cenotaph on the Grand Parade in Halifax took place. Prior to this, Remembrance Day services were held at the Boer War Memorial adjacent to Province House. (Photo: N.S. Archives)
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November 11, 1993

November 11, 1993

This Hour Has 22 Minutes is Launched in 1993 during Canada's 35th general election - originally featuring Cathy Jones, Rick Mercer, Greg Thomey and Mary Walsh, the series featured satirical sketches of the weekly news and Canadian political events. The program is taped before a live audience in Studio 1 at CBHT in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and broadcast on the CBC Television network.(Source Wikipedia, 2017).
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November 12, 1951

November 12, 1951

The Halifax Memorial Public Library was opened after six years of meetings and planning. It closed in August 2014 in preparation for the opening of the new downtown Halifax Central Library on the corner of Spring Garden Road and Queen Street. (Also see Halifax Central Library, December 13, 2014; 'Bellevue House...', March 10, 1885; and 'A serious fire...,' Nov. 6, 1882). (Photo: Halifax Memorial Public Library. N.S. Archives.)
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November 13, 1903

November 13, 1903

Thomas H. Raddall (1903–1994) was born in Hythe, Kent, England. He moved to Nova Scotia with his family at the age of ten. Later in life he resided in Liverpool. Beginning in the early forties, he was an award-winning writer of a number of works on Nova Scotian history, notably Halifax Warden of the North (1948), and historical fiction, including His Majesty’s Yankees (1942), Roger Sudden (1944), Pride’s Fancy (1946),...
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November 14, 1606

November 14, 1606

The Order of Good Cheer celebrated at Annapolis Royal. With its motto to offer “Fellowship and Good Cheer,” the event included an outdoor theatrical performance written by Marc Lescarbot, a lawyer who had arrived in July. He called his play Le Theatre de Neptune en la Nouvelle-France. The play told the story of sailors travelling to the New World, only to encounter Neptune, God of the Sea and his Tritons....
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November 15, 2015

November 15, 2015

After three years of renovations, the Orthodox Lebanese community opened the new Saint Antonios Antiochian Orthodox Church. Inaugurated in 1980, St. Antonios began with 150 parishioners, but a growing community (e.g. from Syria, Greece, Turkey, and Russia) required a plan to accomodate their faithful in a larger facility. And as it turned out, the move was just across the street on the site of the Saint Matthias Anglican Church (1914),...
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November 15, 1787

November 15, 1787

Sir Samuel Cunard (d. 1865) was born in Halifax. Later Cunard would go on to create a shipping from with his father, A. Cunard & Son (1808); become a director, and later president of the Halifax Steam Boat Company (1815-to-1836); than form the British and North American Royal Mail Steam-Packet Company (1839) and in 1879, the Cunard Steamship Company. The Cunard Line celebrated 175 years in 2015. (Image: Samuel Cunard....
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November 16, 1857

November 16, 1857

William Hall (1827–1904) won the Victoria Cross (VC) on this date for his action at the Siege of Lucknow — the first African Nova Scotian person to win the VC. At the time, Hall was with the Royal Navy, serving as captain of the foretop with the HMS Shannon. The British army’s commanding officer of the Lucknow Residency during the siege, with the 32nd (Cornwall) Regiment of Foot, was Nova...
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November 16, 1843

Gabriel Anthony was confirmed as chief of the Mi’kmaq of Annapolis, Digby, Yarmouth, Shelburne, and Queens counties (Kespukwitk – Land Ends) by letters patent under the Great Seal of Nova Scotia. He estimated the number of people “under his charge” at 500.
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November 17, 1885

An important discovery of gold was made in Hants County. Gold was mined at Renfrew, Nova Scotia, near Nine Mile River. The village was the home of one of the largest gold mines in the province. There were other gold mines in the community of Rawdon Gold Mines.
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November 18, 2003

November 18, 2003

The Deep Roots Music Cooperative Society was formed in the Annapolis Valley. Since their founding, the festival has organized an annual (late September) fall weekend program of concerts and workshops in Wolfville.
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November 19, 2011

November 19, 2011

The Government of France announced that Nova Scotian Andrew John Bayly (A.J.B.) Johnston, Canadian historian and writer, would be made a Chevalier of the Ordre des Palmes Académiques in recognition of his body of work associated with the history of the Fortress of Louisbourg. Johnston authored fourteen books of history, over one hundred articles on different aspects of the history of Atlantic Canada, three novels of historical fiction, and wrote...
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November 20, 1785

Governor Parr wrote in his letter to England that “. . .upwards of 25,000 Loyalists have already arrived in the Province, most of whom, with the exception of those who went to Shelburne, came to Halifax before they became distributed throughout the Province”
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November 21, 2014

Robert (Bob) Manuge died at his family home in Lake Annis, Yarmouth County. He was ninety-three. He was instrumental in attracting Michelin Tire to establish plants in Nova Scotia in 1969. He later owned Manuge Galleries Ltd. in Halifax with his wife, Elizabeth. Elizabeth dies on December 1, 2018, also at the age of 93. (Also see, 'Michelin Tire opened its plant...,' Oct. 15, 1971.)
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November 22, 1753

November 22, 1753

Richard John Uniacke (d. 1830) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He was an abolitionist, lawyer, politician and eventually attorney general of Nova Scotia. He later fought in the Eddy Rebellion (also known as the Battle of Fort Cumberland, near the eventual border between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick), which was an effort to bring the American Revolution to Nova Scotia in late 1776. Uniacke was sent as a prisoner...
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November 22, 2006

November 22, 2006

John Allan Cameron died. Known as the “Godfather of Celtic Music,” he was born in Inverness County, Cape Breton. He released his first album in 1968 and went on to release ten more in his career. He was a regular on the Halifax-based CBC program Singalong Jubilee in the 1960s (see Singalong Jubilee, July 3, 1961). He later had his own program, The John Allan Cameron Show, produced with CTV...
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November 23, 1960

Muriel Duckworth, Peggy Hope-Simpson and other interested women began to organize a Nova Scotia Chapter of the Voice of Women (VOW) for Peace in Halifax. On December 7, 1960, a large public meeting was held at the Sir Charles Tupper School where Halifax women were encouraged to join the peace movement. Largely motivated by the collapse of the Paris peace talks that had taken place on May 16 (after a...
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November 23, 1950

November 23, 1950

Jeremiah ‘Jerry’ Alvin Jones died (born in Truro, 1858). A First World War veteran who served with the 106th Battalion (NS Rifles) in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces, he had lied about his age, saying he was thirty-nine, when he was actually fifty-eight. He was later recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal at the Battle of Vimy Ridge, but there was no record of his having received it — it was...
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November 24, 1839

November 24, 1839

William Eager died at the age of forty-three (born in Ireland in 1796). A businessman, artist and teacher, he arrived in Halifax from St. John’s, Newfoundland, in 1834. In 1838, he organized a major art exhibition in Halifax featuring his work and the work of his students, representing over 125 items. In July and August of 1839, he published his first lithographs in two parts, titled Nova Scotia Illustrated. Parts...
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November 24, 1809.

November 24, 1809.

Edward Jordan (1771-1809) was sentenced to hand and put to death on this date on the Black Rock Beach - the first pirate to be hanged in Canada. A law in Nova Scotia “required that the pirates be executed with their bodies displayed in public as warning to other sailors.” His body, covered in tar, was placed in an iron cage, known as a gibbet, which was erected on the...
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November 25, 1982

Halifax Mayor Ron Wallace and Hakodate Mayor Yasushi Yano signed a twinning agreement between their similar cities — a busy port, a historic star-shaped citadel and a northerly climate. In 2017, the thirty-fifth anniversary of the agreement, Mayor Mike Savage met with Hakodate’s mayor, Toshiki Kudo, and various delegates on July 12.
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November 26, 1921

The first public event was held at the newly built King’s Theatre in Annapolis Royal (formerly the Bijou Dream Theatre, which had fallen victim to a fire). The Honourable George Murray, Premier of Nova Scotia, spoke at a political rally hosted at the theatre.
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November 27, 1784

Brook Watson (1735–1807) was appointed agent for Nova Scotia in London. Watson came to Nova Scotia as a young boy and soon began trading, achieving success as a merchant by supplying provisions to the British military (serving under Wolfe) and engaging in business in London, Montreal and Boston. In London, he became a member of the original committee of the Corporation of Lloyd’s of London in 1772, and later an...
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November 28, 1918

November 28, 1918

The transport Aquitania docks at Halifax, bringing back thousands of World War One soldiers from the battlefields of Europe. Later on December 14, the Olympic would dock with a further 5,354 soldiers. Shortly after, Group of Seven war artist Arthur Lismer would write of the ship's arrival to a friend; "It was a magnificent sight - and is the most typical of all such subjects - there will be many...
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November 28, 1831

November 28, 1831

The Seal Island Lighthouse began operation of the southwest coast of Nova Scotia.
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November 28, 1976

November 28, 1976

Mona Leonhardt Foster (née Parsons) died in Wolfville (b. 1901). She grew up in Wolfville and was educated at the Acadia Ladies’ Seminary and later in Boston, where she became an actress for a brief time. She trained as a nurse, but soon married a Dutch businessman, Willem Leonhardt, and moved to Holland. After the German invasion of Holland in May 1940, she and her husband became members of an...
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November 29, 1829

November 29, 1829

St. Mary's Chapel opened for the first time. "St. Mary's Basilica is the oldest Roman Catholic church and first stone church in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The cornerstone for the Basilica was laid on June 29, 1820, and the first mass held in the completed church was in November 1829. St. Mary's Basilica was originally named St. Peter's, taking its name from the first Roman Catholic church in Halifax, which it...
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November 29, 1820

Roman Catholic Bishop, Edmund Burke (Bourke, 1753 - 1820) died. He was born in the Republic of Ireland, became an Roman Catholic priest, educator, and author. Came to America in 1795, and to Upper Canada a year later. He arrived in Nova Scotia as Vicar General in May 1801 (when Catholics were still under the jurisdiction of Quebec). By 1817, he facilitated Nova Scotia to become its own diocese separate...
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November 29, 1949

November 29, 1949

Stan Rogers was born in Ontario, but many Nova Scotians considered him one of their own, as his parents had deep roots in Guysborough County — a place where he spent many summers as a boy. He had a love for music from a young age, receiving his first guitar from an uncle when he was five years old. He played a twelve-string guitar during his many performances. He became...
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November 30, 2011

Joseph Benjamin Marshall, L.L.B., O.N.S., a member of the Eskasoni First Nations, received the Order of Nova Scotia for his dedication to advocating and promoting the rights of the Mi'kmaq. A former Executive Director and a founding member of the Union of Nova Scotia Indians, he was also instrumental in the formation of the Mi'kmaq College Institute and the creation of the Mi'kmaq Studies program at Cape Breton University.
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November 30, 1768.

November 30, 1768.

The North British Society (also known as "The Scots" Cultural Society) was founded in Halifax. St. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, with St. Andrew's Day celebrated on the 30th November. "North British" is an adjective used as an alternative to "Scottish". It is the oldest Scottish cultural society in the British Commonwealth outside the United Kingdom. John Gillespie was appointed the first president of the North British Society...
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November 30, 2007

November 30, 2007

Cape Breton University commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the Beaton Institute, or “Cape Bretoniana,” as it was known back in junior college days. The institute began in 1957 under the leadership of Sister Margaret Beaton (1893–1975) when, after returning from studies at Edinburgh University in Scotland, she had been encouraged to start a regional collection of Scottish and Gaelic materials pertaining to Cape Breton Island. The institute was later home...
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November 30, 1968

A meeting was held to discuss the creation of an organization to advocate for the black community in Nova Scotia. On August 15, 1969, with funding support from the federal government, the Black United Front (BUF) was created. Jules Oliver became its first executive director.
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