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October 1, 2000
October 1, 1867
October 2, 1935
October 3, 1914
October 4, 1854
October 5, 1987
October 5, 1946
October 6, 2016
October 7, 1763
October 8, 2004
October 9, 1882
October 9, 1997
October 10, 2005
October 11, 1942
October 12, 1917
October 13, 1967
October 14, 1921
October 14, 1942
October 15, 2004
October 15, 1971
October 16, 2016
October 17, 1831
October 18, 1814
October 18, 1783
October 19, 1901
October 19, 1930
October 20, 1803
October 20, 1901
October 21, 1910
October 21, 2003
October 22, 1958
October 23, 1928
October 23, 1958
October 24, 1816
October 25, 1951
October 25, 1944
October 26, 1938
October 27, 2016
October 27, 1874
October 28, 1851
October 29, 1934
October 30, 1915
October 31, 1972
October 31, 1930
October 1, 2000

October 1, 2000

A historic plaque ceremony commemorating the Mi’kmaq cultural landscape took place at Kejimkujik National Park in recognition of the Mi’kmaq presence there since time immemorial. The park has the largest concentration of Mi’kmaq petroglyphs in eastern North America. By 2013, Parks Canada had to prohibit visiting the petroglyphs without permission in order to protect this important cultural resource. (Photo: European vessel with stick figures, n.d., one of Kejimkujik’s petroglyph rock...
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October 1, 1867

October 1, 1867

Susannah Woodhouse (Culverwell) Oland (1818–1885) and her husband, John James Dunn Oland (1819–1870), began their brewery in Dartmouth at Turtle Grove, later to be named The Army and Navy Brewery — a name that came from their most appreciative customers. After John Oland’s untimely death in 1870, Susannah, with her three sons and the support of investors, changed the name to S. Oland, Sons and Co, continuing to run the...
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October 2, 1935

October 2, 1935

Nova Scotia photographer Amos Lawson Hardy died in Kentville (b. 1860). As noted in the Morning Herald on October 4, his photographic works were “sold in all parts of the world” and were a catalyst in advertising and promoting Nova Scotia, especially the Annapolis Valley Land of Evangeline, as a tourist destination. (First photo: A Modern Conception of the Maid Evangeline, by Amos Lawson Hardy, c. 1917. Second photo: Amos...
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October 3, 1914

The first Canadian Contingent left for England in the largest convoy to cross the Atlantic in the First World War. Over the course of the war, more than 650,000 Canadians made that crossing. More than 66,000 did not return. (Also see 'The Last Steps...', August 27, 2016.)
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October 4, 1854

October 4, 1854

The Great Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition arrived in Halifax for the first time. Inspired by the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London, the exhibition took over Province House grounds for a week in October. (Image: The Industrial Exhibition Building at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Robert Wilkie, George DuBois,1854.)
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October 5, 1987

October 5, 1987

Custio Clayton was born in Dartmouth. He took up amateur boxing, winning his first bout at the age of eleven. After finishing high school, he qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics and became the first Canadian to win a boxing bout in eight years at the Olympics. As of 2016, he was a nine-time Canadian amateur boxing champion. (Photo: CBC.ca, Ng Han Guan/Canadian Press.)
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October 5, 1946

October 5, 1946

Eddie Carvery was born in Africville. He undertook one of the longest civil rights protests in Canadian history. Beginning in the 1970s, he protested the forced removal of the Africville community in the North End of Halifax in the 1960s. (Also see Africville apology, February 24, 2010.) Carvery’s struggle is chronicled in The Hermit of Africville: The Life of Eddie Carvery by Jon Tattrie (Pottersfield Press).
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October 6, 2016

October 6, 2016

Dalhousie University permanently raised the Mi’kmaq Santé Mawiómi flag, sometimes referred to as the Grand Council flag, as a gesture that the university recognizes that it is located on 'traditional territory of the Mi’kmaq people'. There are differences of opinion on whether the flag should be flown vertically or horizontally. The meaning in the design of the flag: • Wapék (White) — Denotes the purity of Creation • Mekwék Klujjewey...
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October 7, 1763

Île Royale (Cape Breton) was ceded to the British under the terms of the Treaty of Paris and came under the colonial governance of mainland Nova Scotia. The following year, the Acadians who had been expelled were permitted to return. By 1783 and 1784, waves of Loyalist settlers began to arrive (more than 30,000). In 1784, Nova Scotia was divided into three separate colonies: Cape Breton Island, New Brunswick and...
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October 8, 2004

October 8, 2004

Glace Bay–born comedian Ron James (b. 1958) won in the category for Best Live Comedy Standup for The Road Between My Ears at the first annual Canadian Comedy Awards in Toronto. He appeared in dozens of commercials, television roles and films. (Photo: Ron James Entertainment Inc.)
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October 9, 1882

October 9, 1882

Oscar Wilde visited Halifax and gave two readings at the Academy of Music. The Academy was located where the Maritime Centre now stands on Barrington Street in Halifax. “Over 1500 Haligonians attended his lecture The Decorative Arts and 400 attended a lecture later the next evening on The House Beautiful.” Three years later, on February 14, 1895, Wilde opened his new play The Importance of Being Earnest in London. (Also...
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October 9, 1997

October 9, 1997

The Celtic Colours International Festival began, running till October 18. Two Cape Bretoners, Joella Foulds and Max MacDonald, used the hallmarks of Cape Breton — its music and scenery — as the basis for an annual festival, running for nine days. In 2017, the festival ran from October 6 to 14. (https://celtic-colours.com).
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October 10, 2005

October 10, 2005

Renowned rug hooking artist Elizabeth LeFort died in Chéticamp (b. 1914). She learned to rug hook from her mother at a young age. Particularly skilled at replicating photographs, LeFort created highly detailed portraits, some of which were held in the Vatican Fine Arts Gallery, the White House and Buckingham Palace. The Elizabeth Lefort Gallery displaying her work was opened on August 15, 1983. (Photo: Elizabeth LeFort. Lestroispignons.com.)
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October 11, 1942

October 11, 1942

The RCMP schooner St. Roch slipped into Halifax Harbour, ending the first successful west-to-east navigation of the Northwest Passage. The nine-member crew, under the command of Sergeant (later Superintendant) Henry Larsen, left Vancouver in 1940, spending two winters frozen in ice. After a refit in Dartmouth, the ship made its east-to-west transit of the passage in eighty-six days. (Photo: The RCMP schooner St. Roch took on water as it made...
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October 12, 1917

October 12, 1917

Nova Scotian born (at Grand Pré), Sir Robert L. Borden (1854-1937), formed federal government in Ottawa (Unionist). (Photo: Robert L. Borden. Library and Archives Canada.)
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October 13, 1967

October 13, 1967

Black Friday in Cape Breton — Hawker Siddeley announced the closing of the Sydney steel plant by April 30, 1968. The plant had been purchased from DOSCO in August 1957 and employed 5,700 workers. But declining markets, and lack of further capital investment for refurbishing, led to a reduction in the workforce to 3,200 by 1967. And though there was hope for a recommended expansion of the plant, the company...
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October 14, 1921

The first issue of the Maritime Labour Herald was published, announcing itself as “a paper devoted to the interests of labor.” “We are a working class paper in working class dress and right on the job fighting the battle of the working class.” Organized by J.B. McLachlan and B.N. Brodie, it was guided by the editorship of William Ulrich Cotton. The paper’s circulation reached over 6,000 and continued for five...
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October 14, 1942

October 14, 1942

While carrying 237 passengers and a crew of forty-five between Sydney and Port-Aux-Basques, the ferry SS Caribou was sunk by a German U-Boat, with 136 lives lost. (Photo: The SS Caribou. Courtesy of Queen Elizabeth II Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland.)
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October 15, 2004

October 15, 2004

Shirley Burnham Elliott died in Kentville (born 1916). She was a librarian and writer on Nova Scotian history (author of the Nova Scotia Book of Days, 1979), a community volunteer and mentor. She was Nova Scotia’s legislative librarian from 1954 to 1982, was awarded honorary degrees by Acadia and Dalhousie Universities and was a recipient of the Order of Nova Scotia (2003). (Photo: Shirley Burnham Elliott. Courtesy of the N.S....
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October 15, 1971

Michelin Tire opened its plant in Bridgewater. Construction on this plant, and one at Granton in Pictou County, had begun in 1970. A third plant in Waterville, King’s County, would be announced in 1979. The initial investment was valued at over $100 million, with Michelin providing $35 million, and Nova Scotia Industrial Estates providing $50 million, plus various provincial and federal government grants. The federal government also waived duties for...
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October 16, 2016

African Nova Scotia leader, politician and activist Dr. Lynn Jones, in cooperation with Saint Mary’s University, announced the addition of the Lynn Jones African-Canadian & Diaspora Heritage Collection to the University Archives. The collection documented the lives of Lynn, her family and over fifty years of African, African diasporic and African Nova Scotian heritage and history. (Also see Burnley ‘Rocky’ Jones, July 29, 2013.)
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October 17, 1831

The Halifax Mechanics’ Library Association was established. Their first president was John S. Thompson. By December a public meeting was held and the Mechanics’ Institute was also born, with Dr. William Grigor as its President. Joseph Howe became Vice-President and delivered the opening address on January 11, 1832.
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October 18, 1814

The British transport ship Sovereign was wrecked off Saint Paul Island, killing 202 British troops, with thirty-seven survivors.
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October 18, 1783

More Loyalist families arrived in Digby. Over a thousand had arrived in May. Digby was named after Rear Admiral Robert Digby (1732–1815), who had brought Loyalists to the area.
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October 19, 1901

October 19, 1901

A cornerstone for the South African War Memorial at Province House was laid by the Duke of York (who became King George V). Earlier, a grand parade had taken place along Granville Street to mark his visit. (Photo: A parade along Granville Street marked the visit of HRH the Duke of York (the future King George V). Looking north toward Halifax Harbour and Dartmouth (1901). From Halifax A Visual Legacy,...
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October 19, 1930

October 19, 1930

Ron Joyce was born on October 19, 1930 and raised in Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia. He later served in the Royal Canadian Navy, and then served as a police officer until 1965 when he branched out to be an owner of a Dairy Queen franchise in Hamilton, Ontario. He later met hockey player, Tim Horton, and entered a franchise partnership with him in 1967. After Horton’s death in a car accident...
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October 20, 1803

October 20, 1803

The Halifax Town Clock, built on the east side of Citadel Hill under the direction of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, began keeping time for the garrison and town residents. It is said that the prince, then commander in chief of all military forces in British North America, wished to resolve the tardiness of the local garrison. (Also see Prince Edward, June 28, 1794.). (Photo: The Old Town Garrison Clock,...
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October 20, 1901

October 20, 1901

A great fire occurred in Sydney. Over 67 buildings were destroyed and 31 families lost their homes. (Photos: Beaton Institute).
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October 21, 1910

October 21, 1910

The armoured cruiser HMCS Niobe, the Canadian Navy’s first ship, arrived in Halifax. Already considered obsolescent, she was initially manned by Royal Naval personnel, on loan to the new service. (Photo: The armoured cruiser HMCS Niobe, 1910. From First to Die, Bryan Elson.)
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October 21, 2003

October 21, 2003

Mi’kmaw educator Sister Dorothy Moore, received the Order of Nova Scotia (ONS). Born in the Mi’kmaq community of Membertou in 1933, she became a member of the Congregation of Sisters of St. Martha of Antigonish in 1956. (Photo: Dorothy Moore. Communication Nova Scotia.)
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October 22, 1958

October 22, 1958

Blanche Margaret Meagher (b. Halifax in 1911) was appointed ambassador to Israel (1958–1961) — Canada’s first woman ambassador. From 1969 to 1973 she was ambassador to Sweden, and served in Mexico and England. She was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1974. (Photo: Margaret Meagher, Canadian Ambassador to Israel, speaks with Foreign Minister Golda Meir on Israel's Independence Day 1959. Moshe Pridan. Wikipedia Creative Commons.)
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October 23, 1928

October 23, 1928

The Lord Nelson Hotel opened in Halifax, on the corner of Spring Garden Road and South Park Street on what was known as the old Dwyer property. It was seven storeys with 200 rooms — named after England’s greatest naval hero: Horatio Nelson. (Photo: The Lord Nelson Hotel, Halifax, 1941. N.S. Archives.)
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October 23, 1958

October 23, 1958

A seismic jolt, known in miner terms as a “bump,” occurred in the No. 2 colliery mine at Springhill. There were 174 men working 1,200 metres underground at the time. Seventy-five were killed. Nineteen men who had been trapped were found alive a week later (twelve were found on October 29 and seven on November 1). Forty-six-year-old African Canadian Maurice Ruddick was one of the seven last miners to be...
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October 24, 1816

October 24, 1816

George Ramsay, ninth Earl of Dalhousie (1770–1838), was sworn in as lieutenant governor of Nova Scotia, serving from 1816 to 1820. He later became the governor general of Canada, and served from 1820 to 1828. He founded Dalhousie College in 1818 at the north end of the Grand Parade (moved in 1886 to a five-acre site on the South Common). He also provided funds for the maintenance of the Garrison...
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October 25, 1951

October 25, 1951

Louis Armstrong performed at the Queen Elizabeth Auditorium. Tickets were $2.20 (including tax). Besides Armstrong playing trumpet and doing vocals, Jack Teagarden played trombone and vocals, Cozy Cole played drums and Earl ‘Fatha’ Hines played piano. (First photo: Louis Armstrong. Halifax history.ca. Second photo: Ticket to Louis Armstrong concert. 1951. Halifax history.ca
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October 25, 1944

October 25, 1944

Lieutenant Edward Francis Arab (b. 1915), died at age twenty-nine on the frontlines in the Battle of the Scheldt (Holland). He was one of the youngest graduates of Dalhousie Law School (1937) and was the first president of the Canadian Lebanon Society (1938). He was the son of Louis A. Arab and Sadie Assiff. His paternal grandfather, Abraham, was among the first villagers from Diman (Lebanon) to settle in Nova...
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October 26, 1938

October 26, 1938

The Bluenose schooner won its last International Fisherman’s Cup Race by less than three minutes, winning three races out of five against the Gertrude L. Thebaud off Gloucester, Massachusetts. (Photo: Bluenose romping across the finish line to win the last race in the International Fishermen’s Trophy Series and snatch the championship from the Gertrude L. Thebaud. N.S. Archives.)
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October 27, 2016

October 27, 2016

Daniel Christmas (b. 1956), Mi’kmaw leader and lifelong resident of the Membertou First Nation, was named as a “non-partisan” senator, the first Mi’kmaw representative to the Canadian Senate, by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Christmas was previously the director of advisory services for the Union of Nova Scotia Indians. (Photo: Daniel Christmas. Atlanticctvnews.ca.)
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October 27, 1874

October 27, 1874

The schooner W.D. Lawrence was launched at Maitland — the largest wooden-hulled ship ever built in the Maritimes, at 2,459 tons and a keel length of 244 feet 9 inches. She was named after her builder and owner, William D. Lawrence. The ship cost $107,452 to build. Lawrence sailed it with his family and crew for almost three years and authored an account of their travels in 1880. The ship...
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October 28, 1851

October 28, 1851

Rev. Norman McLeod sailed from St. Ann’s, Nova Scotia to New Zealand. McLeod was born in Lochinver, Scotland. Later he was educated as a Presbyterian minister and immigrated to Pictou, Nova Scotia with his family in 1817. He developed a large following who were dubbed the Normanites. By 1820 he had moved his followers to St. Ann's on Cape Breton Island. More immigrants arrived there from the Hebrides, speaking Gaelic....
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October 29, 1934

October 29, 1934

A tablet was unveiled at the Royal Artillery Park in Halifax by Lieutenant Governor Walter H. Covert recognizing the historic importance of the Cambridge Military Library, which had housed the Garrison Library collection since 1817. In 1902, the library was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge. (Also see George Ramsay, ninth Earl of Dalhousie, October 24, 1816.). (Photo: The Cambridge Military Library. hmhps.ca).
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October 30, 1915

October 30, 1915

Sir Charles Tupper died at Bexley Heath, Kent, England. A former premier of Nova Scotia, as well as prime minister. He led Nova Scotia into Confederation. He was also the last remaining Father of Confederation. (Also see Sir Charles Tupper, July 2, 1821.). (Photo: Sir Charles Tupper. By George Grantham Bain.).
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October 31, 1972

October 31, 1972

Cape Breton Magazine Issue #1 begins publishing. Contents included: •Lee Cremo Speaks •How to Make Rope from Wood •The Future of Gaelic on Cape Breton •Le Sorcier de Cheticamp •The Breeding Behavior of the Grey Seal off the Coast of Cape Breton •An duine gu'n churam •How to Make an Axe Handle •Wildflowers of Cape Breton. 74 issues were published by writer, publisher (Breton Books) and folk-historian, Ronald (Ron) Caplan....
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October 31, 1930

October 31, 1930

The Capitol Theatre opened in Halifax, at the corner of Barrington and Spring Garden Road (later the location of the Maritime Centre). Before the Capitol Theatre, this location was home to the Academy of Music, renamed the Majestic in 1918. It had opened in 1877, and was home to countless musical and theatre productions for over fifty years. It was demolished in 1929. The Capitol was demolished in 1974. (First...
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