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September 1, 1972
September 1, 1864
September 1, 1996
September 2, 1750
September 3, 1783
September 4, 1981
September 5, 1933
September 5, 1755
September 6, 1985
September 6, 1934
September 7, 2006
September 7, 1948
September 8, 1629
September 9, 1843
September 9, 1859
September 10, 2018
September 10, 1944
September 10, 1954
September 10, 1939
September 11, 2017
September 11, 1800
September 11, 1749
September 12, 2011
September 13, 1984
September 14, 1767
September 14, 1853
September 15, 1773
September 16, 1939
September 17, 1999
September 18, 2012
September 19, 1839
September 20, 1943
September 21, 1932
September 21, 2014
September 22, 1993
September 22, 1901
September 23, 1835
September 24, 1974
September 25, 1726
September 26, 1832
September 26, 1959
September 27, 1948
September 28, 2012
September 29, 1965
September 30, 1749
September 1, 1972

September 1, 1972

Mermaid Theatre Company is registered under the Societies Act of Nova Scotia - founded in Wolfville by Sara Lee Lewis, Tom Miller and the late Evelyn Garbary (the company later moved to Windsor in 1987). It began limited touring in the Spring of 1972, with their first performance taking place at Aldershot School. By September 1972, Mermaid was on it's way - and the company is now in its 46th...
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September 1, 1864

September 1, 1864

The Charlottetown Conference was held on Prince Edward Island, with thirty-six men meeting to discuss union amongst the Maritime colonies. But this intention was soon overwhelmed with discussions about a larger union. (Photo: Delegates to the Charlottetown Conference, 1864, by George P. Roberts. Library and Archives Canada).
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September 1, 1996

September 1, 1996

The Puck Starts Here was published by Goose Lane Editions. Author Garth Vaughan provided the critical research and background to the origins of ice hockey in Canada — with the evidence that the early development of the game began in Windsor, Nova Scotia, in 1800 — with King’s College students playing an Irish field game called “Hurley-on-Ice.” Between 1840 and 1860, the game became known as “Ice Hockey,” to describe...
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September 2, 1750

September 2, 1750

The first service was held at St. Paul’s Church. Services were conducted by Reverend William Tutty (1715–1754), who served as the first minister from 1750 to 1754. St. Paul’s is the oldest surviving Protestant church (Anglican tradition) in Canada and the oldest building in Halifax, designated as a National Historic Site in Canada in 1981. It was built from timbers cut in Boston. St. Paul’s was designated as Halifax’s first...
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September 3, 1783

September 3, 1783

Colonel Stephen Blucke (1752–1792) with his wife Margaret, and two servants, led an all-black regiment called the Black Pioneers who had fought for the British during the American Revolution to settle in Birchtown, Shelburne County, Nova Scotia. Birchtown was named in honour of Brigadier-General Sam Birch, who issued “certificates of freedom” to the freed blacks who had evacuated New York. Blucke has been referred to as “the true founder of...
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September 4, 1981

September 4, 1981

Visual artist Jack L. Gray died in West Palm Beach, Florida. Born in Halifax in 1927 and educated at the Nova Scotia School of Art and Design, he studied at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts under Arthur Lismer. He spent several seasons at sea with the dory-fishing schooner fleet out of Lunenburg, sketching and taking photographs of marine scenes. After he moved to New York City, he produced a...
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September 5, 1933

September 5, 1933

Eliza Ritchie died (b. 1856). A scholar (BA 1887, LLD'27), author, educator, liberal humanist and feminist, she was the daughter of John W. Ritchie, a Nova Scotia Father of Confederation. She was educated at Dalhousie University and Cornell (Philosophy), and was a cousin to the Canadian diplomat and author, Charles Ritchie. She is considered the first female graduate of a Canadian university to earn a PhD. During the 1890s, she...
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September 5, 1755

September 5, 1755

At their parish church at Grand Pré, a group of Acadian men (418) were officially told by Lieutenant Colonel John Winslow that they and their families were all being deported from the area. On July 28, the Nova Scotia Council had officially announced that the British Crown was removing all Acadians from Nova Scotia. The “first wave” of the deportation orders began on August 10 at Chignecto, after the Battle...
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September 6, 1985

September 6, 1985

The Nova Scotia feminist newspaper Pandora began publishing from Halifax,“written by women, for women and about women.’” Twenty-nine issues were published. (Photo: The Nova Scotia feminist newspaper, Pandora. Gay.hfxns.org).
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September 6, 1934

Lockeport native, actor and radio announcer Hugh Mills began a children’s show on CHNS radio known as Uncle Mel’s. He read comics to children for fifteen minutes six days a week. The show lasted fifteen years. During World War Two, Mills also organized the Halifax Concert Parties. He was also a partner with his brother, Willett, in the popular Mills Brothers clothing store on Spring Garden Road, and was instrumental...
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September 7, 2006

Dr. Mayann Elizabeth Francis (b. 1946 in Sydney) became the thirty-first lieutenant governor of Nova Scotia. She was the first black person to hold the vice-regal position, and the second woman to serve in this role. The daughter of an Archpriest of the African Orthodox Church, her parents were both born in the Caribbean, relocating to Sydney in the early 1940s from New York City. She grew up in Whitney...
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September 7, 1948

September 7, 1948

Margaret MacDonald died (born in Bailey's Brook, Pictou County, Nova Scotia, 26 February 1873). She was a Canadian Military nurse - one of the founders of the Canadian Army Nursing Corps, and one of the first females to hold a position in the completely male-dominated military of her time. She is also known for her breakthrough role as a military nurse during World War I. During this time, she was...
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September 8, 1629

September 8, 1629

Captain Charles Daniel of the French attacked Sir James Stewart, the fourth Lord Ochiltree of Killeith’s settlement on Cape Breton. Known as the Siege of Baleine, Daniel captured the fort and the Scottish colonists were taken prisoner. Daniel later had the prisoners help him build Fort Sainte Anne at Grand Cibou - what we know today as Englishtown on St Anne's Bay. As the crow flies Englishtown is about 65...
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September 9, 1843

September 9, 1843

Thomas McCulloch died in Halifax (b. 1776). He was a prominent Presbyterian minister, educator, author and office holder. Born in 1776 in Scotland, he settled in Pictou in 1803. He became the principal of Pictou Academy and, in 1838, the first president of Dalhousie University. He was author of the satirical Letters of Mephibosheth Stepsure. (Photo: Thomas McCulloch (1776–1843), the first president of Dalhousie University. AST, by D. MacGee. From...
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September 9, 1859

September 9, 1859

Over two blocks of Granville Street in Halifax (including sixty buildings) were destroyed by fire.
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September 10, 2018

September 10, 2018

Nova Scotian-born character actor Peter Donat died on this day. He was 90. Born Pierre Collingwood Donat in Kentville, N.S. on 20 January, 1928. He was inspired to become an actor by his uncle, British film star, Robert Donat, who had won a best-actor Oscar for his performance in Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939). He went on to graduate from Acadia University and later studied at the Yale School of Drama...
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September 10, 1944

September 10, 1944

Winston Churchill (1874–1965) arrived in Halifax en route to Quebec to attend the Quebec Conference (held from September 12 to 16) between the British and American governments, hosted by Canada. A year earlier, Churchill had come through Halifax in secret for the first Quebec Conference. For security reasons, Halifax at the time was designated the “East Coast Port.” (Image: Editorial cartoonist Bob Chambers’s visual take on Churchill’s “secret” visit to...
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September 10, 1954

September 10, 1954

Henry D. Hicks (1915–1990) was elected leader of the NS Liberal Party. Hicks became an MLA in 1945, and was premier from 1954 to 1956, when he lost to Robert Stanfield’s Progressive Conservatives. He resigned as Leader of the Opposition in 1960 and joined Dalhousie University. He was president of Dalhousie from 1963 till 1980. (Photo: Henry Hicks, 1968. Dalhousie University Archives).
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September 10, 1939

September 10, 1939

Canada declared war on Germany. "Canada was unprepared for war. The regular army of 4500 men, augmented by 51,000 partly-trained reservists, possessed virtually no modern equipment. The air force had fewer than 20 modern combat aircraft while the navy’s combat potential consisted of only six destroyers, the smallest class of ocean-going warships. It was a modest beginning." (Canada War Museum). (Headlines: The London Free Press. Sept. 11, 1939).
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September 11, 2017

September 11, 2017

The Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame looks back at Nova Scotia's rich sport heritage this year (2017) and names, in order, the Top 15 athletes in Nova Scotia sport history, beginning September 11 and going till December 18. See: http://nsshf.com/Events/Top15/tabid/2224/Default.aspx
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September 11, 1800

September 11, 1800

The cornerstone of Nova Scotia Government House was laid by Governor John Wentworth. It is the oldest official government residence in Canada. In 1819, while he served as an aide to the Lieutenant Governor Lord Dalhousie, J.E. Woolford created a sketch of the residence. (Painting: Nova Scotia Government House, 1819. Etching by J.E. Woolford. Dalhousie Killam Library Special Collections.)
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September 11, 1749

September 11, 1749

On this day, Governor Edward Cornwallis wrote to the Board of Trade concerning the status of the fort at the top of Citadel Hill. This was the first of four generations of forts built on the hill. The last one started in 1828 and took thirty years to complete. The two-year period (1869–71) when the 78th Highlanders were garrisoned in Halifax became the focal point of Parks Canada and the...
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September 12, 2011

September 12, 2011

African Nova Scotian poet and educator Maxine Tynes died (b.1949). She was an acclaimed poet (winner of the Milton Acorn People’s Poetry Award) and dedicated high school teacher. In 1986, she also became the first African Canadian woman to sit on Dalhousie’s Board of Governors, serving until 1994. Tynes is quoted as saying, “My poems are great shouts of the joy that I feel and share; the deep passion that...
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September 13, 1984

September 13, 1984

Pope John Paul II visited Halifax and spoke to an estimated crowd of 75,000 on the North Commons. (Photo: Pope John Paul II on the Halifax Common, 1984. From Halifax: The First 250 Years, Judith Fingard, Janet Guildford, and David Sutherland).
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September 14, 1767

Captain William Owen (1737–1778) began his exploratory tour of Nova Scotia, journeying from Halifax to Minas Basin via Dartmouth Lakes and the Shubenacadie River. Owen had been commissioned by Nova Scotia Governor Lord William Campbell (1730–1778), whom Owen had served in India and Nova Scotia.
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September 14, 1853

The first sod of the European and North American Railway (E&NA) was turned by Lady Anna Maria Head, the wife of New Brunswick Lieutenant Governor Edmund Head (he later served as governor general of Canada from 1854 to 1861).The railway, was conceived at a railway conference in Portland, Maine in 1850 by railroad entrepreneur John A. Poor, intended to link Portland (the eastern terminus of the US rail network) with...
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September 15, 1773

September 15, 1773

The Hector arrived at Pictou. After a voyage of eleven weeks, the ship landed at Brown’s Point with 189 settlers (having lost eighteen on the voyage to dysentery and smallpox). The settlers originated from Lochbroom — Northern Scottish Highlanders who spoke mainly Gaelic. The provisions they were promised didn’t materialize and they had to quickly build shelter before winter set in. (Photo: The Hector. Photograph by Dennis Jarvis. Wikipedia Creative...
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September 16, 1939

September 16, 1939

The maiden Second World War convoy of eighteen merchant vessels sailed from Halifax for Britain. Over 377 convoys sailed from September 16, 1939 to May 23, 1945, during the Battle of the Atlantic — representing a total of 25,343 merchant ships. The battle claimed more than 70,000 Allied seamen, merchant mariners and airmen, including 2,024 Royal Canadian Navy personnel and 1,629 Merchant Navy seafarers. Each year on the first Sunday...
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September 17, 1999

The Supreme Court of Canada affirmed in the Donald Marshall case a 5–2 decision regarding treaty rights to hunt, fish and gather in pursuit of a moderate livelihood, stemming from the treaties of 1760–1761 that were signed by the Mi’kmaq, Malisset, Passamaquoddy and the British Crown. The Supreme Court did not define how these rights were to be implemented, but instead encouraged the parties to negotiate a resolution in a...
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September 18, 2012

September 18, 2012

Award-winning Canadian Celtic folk musician Mary Jane Lamond and fiddler Wendy MacIsaac released their album Seinn. It was named one of the top ten folk and Americana albums of 2012 by the National Public Radio in the United States. (Image: Allmusic.com)
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September 19, 1839

September 19, 1839

Albion Mines Railroad, Nova Scotia’s first steam railway, opened between Stellarton and Pictou Harbour, hauling coal to the pier. There were three locomotives assigned to the job, called Samson, Hercules and John Buddle. This marked the province’s entry into the industrial revolution. The railroad and mines were operated by a London-based firm, the General Mining Association, “which held an exclusive lease of nearly all the mineral rights in Nova Scotia”...
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September 20, 1943

September 20, 1943

The Canadian naval destroyer HMCS St. Croix, commanded by Lieutenant Commander A.H. Dobson (age forty-two), was torpedoed by the German submarine, U-305, while she was protecting convoys, which were heavily “beset by a wolfpack” south of Iceland as they sailed toward Nova Scotia. The St. Croix sank in six minutes, with the loss of 146 lives. (A list of the men lost can be found at uboat.net.) Most were under...
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September 21, 1932

September 21, 1932

A bust of Sir Walter Scott (1771–1832) was unveiled by the North British Society at the entrance to the Public Gardens on the hundredth anniversary of Scott’s death. He was a noted Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia and North America. The bust was created by Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey, who was at the time a leading English sculptor. (Photo: Wikipedia Creative Commons).
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September 21, 2014

September 21, 2014

The inaugural Lunenburg Doc Film Festival (September 21–23) began. In 2017, the fourth annual festival was expanded to four days of documentary film screenings, celebrations, free youth and senior programs, free community and educational events and an industry symposium for filmmakers.
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September 22, 1993

September 22, 1993

Visual artist Marguerite Zwicker died in Halifax. She was born in Yarmouth in 1904 and studied at the Nova Scotia College of Art. She later taught painting at Acadia University, and married fellow artist Leroy Zwicker (1906–1987). In 1957 they took over Zwicker’s Gallery, the oldest gallery in Halifax (founded in 1886). Until the establishment of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and the university art galleries in the 1970s,...
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September 22, 1901

September 22, 1901

Charles Huggins was born in Halifax (d. 1997). He was a Nobel Prize winner in medicine, and graduate of Acadia University (1920). The award was “. . . for discovering in 1941 that hormones could be used to control the spread of some cancers.” Huggins was also chancellor of Acadia from 1972 to 1979.
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September 23, 1835

September 23, 1835

The first installment of Thomas Chandler Haliburton’s The Clockmaker was published in the Novascotian by Joseph Howe under the title Recollections of Nova Scotia. Haliburton presented a total of twenty-two sketches, which were published in 1836 as a first series collection titled The Clockmaker, or, the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slicksville. It was hugely popular, not only in Nova Scotia but also in Britain and the United...
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September 24, 1974

The weekly tabloid the Bedford-Sackville News began publishing. It expanded to six days a week in 1979. By 1981 it was renamed the Daily News, gaining a reputation for hard-hitting provincial news stories. The paper was bought out in 1985 and the original publishers began Frank magazine in 1987, focused on gossip and the private lives of the well-heeled and famous in the Maritime Provinces. In March 2001, they began...
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September 25, 1726

Acadian deputies in the district around Annapolis Royal were summoned before Lieutenant Governor Lawrence Armstrong to sign an unqualified oath of allegiance. They insisted on freedom of religion and exemption from bearing arms. No agreement was reached. A year later, the inhabitants were encouraged by a written confirmation of a military exemption, but this was not ratified further. The Acadians mistakenly believed that they were entitled to neutrality in war...
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September 26, 1832

After travelling in the United States, Upper and Lower Canada and New Brunswick, British Lieutenant E.T. Coke arrived in Nova Scotia in September. He made his way from Saint John, NB, to Digby, sailing up to Annapolis Royal and then going by coach up to Bridgetown and on to Kentville, where he stayed the night. He left the next morning for Windsor, where he stayed overnight, before leaving on his...
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September 26, 1959

A.R. Mosher, former president of the Canadian Labour Congress and a native of Halifax, died.
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September 27, 1948

September 27, 1948

The Seahorse Tavern opened on Argyle Street in Halifax (for men only). Taverns had been closed in 1916 during the First World War. The Seahorse was the first to be allowed to open in Halifax. It moved to Gottingen Street in 2014. (Photo: The Seahorse Tavern, 1947. From Halifax A Visual Legacy, William Naftel).
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September 28, 2012

The Pictou Landing Native Women’s Association / Group (PLNWG) announced a training initiative to support their multi-year, community based, participatory Health Survey Training Plan — Identifying, Documenting, Mapping, and Mobilizing Environment and Health Knowledge in Pictou Landing: An Environmental Health Survey. Out of concern for their children, families, and community, the PLNWG mobilized around the issue of Boat Harbour in 2010 to address the question, “Is Boat Harbour making us...
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September 29, 1965

September 29, 1965

Ross Douglas Hamilton died (b. 1889). Known as ‘Marjorie’ in the Dumbells, he was a talented female impersonator from Pugwash, Nova Scotia. He had enlisted as a private with the Canadian Army during the First World War and served as an ambulance driver in France before being selected by Captain Merton Plunkett to join the Dumbells Canadian Army Third Division Concert Party as a soldier-entertainer. The Dumbells gained popularity across...
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September 30, 1749

September 30, 1749

Soon after a written warning to Cornwallis, forty Mi’kmaq and Acadian warriors led by Beausoleil Broussard surprised a woodcutting crew at Major Gilman’s sawmill in Dartmouth. Two men were scalped, and three were decapitated; one escaped to sound the alarm. This was the first of numerous Mi’kmaq attacks which kept the settlers ill at ease and within the palisades of Halifax. (Also see, During the first...March 26, 1751.). (Photo: Memorial...
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