The earliest approximate map of the geographical area that later became known as Nova Scotia (but was at the time a part of the lands of the Mi’kmaq, now referred to as Mi’kma’ki) was created by Portuguese cartographer Diogo Homem (1521–1576). He had been banished from Portugal in 1545, but later settled in Venice where he made the map in Latin. It was later translated to English for the High Court of the British Admiralty. John Cabot’s earlier map of 1544 was not as detailed as Homem’s. (Image credit: The earliest approximate map of Nova Scotia, created by Portuguese cartographer Diogo Homem, as identified in the Queen Mary I Atlas).