The French and Indian War begins — later (1756) officially becoming The Seven Years’ War between England and France. In Nova Scotia, it started with a series of conflicts in June of 1755, namely the Battle of Fort Beauséjour, with the deportation of the Acadians in the fall. By July 1757, there were in excess of 20,000 soldiers and sailors in Halifax with plans to attack the French at Louisbourg. Halifax had rapidly transformed from a small, insignificant seaport into a major military and naval base on the North Atlantic coast. Soon Army officer (and watercolour painter) Thomas Davies (1737–1812) would arrive with the fleet on July 9. He would paint a picture of this time called A View of Halifax in Nova Scotia from Cornwallis Island, with a Squadron going off to Louisburg in the year 1757. The squadron’s effort failed and it wasn’t until May of 1758 that another British attack was
launched against Louisbourg. That time it succeeded. (Painting: A View of Halifax in Nova Scotia from Cornwallis Island, with a Squadron Going Off to Louisbourg in the Year 1757, by Thomas Davies. N.S. Archives. National Gallery of Canada. Wikipedia Creative Commons.)